In Langley City, Brenda Scott watched the eclipse through protective welder’s glasses. Dan Ferguson Langley Times

Safe viewing: how people watched the eclipse

From manufactured to home-made

The eclipse brought people outdoors with protective viewing devices that ranged from special glasses to home-made pinhole cameras and repurposed welding glasses.

Making a pinhole is quick and simple.

Cut a piece of white paper to fit the bottom of a long box — a cereal box is ideal. Tape it down and then seal the top of the box closed with tape. Cut a square hole at the top on each end. Cover one hole with aluminum foil and poke a small hole in the foil.

Standing with your back to the sun, look into the open hole and align the box so that the eclipse is projected onto the bottom of the box.

Follow the instructions here.

You can also use a shoebox:

Live coverage:

Welding glasses, provided they were shade 12 or darker, also provided a safe viewing experience.