A cougar

Cougar attack in South Langley prompts warning

800-pound heifer killed on farm near 216 Street and 18 Avenue on Sunday.

Dairy farmers Ralph and Sonja Anderlini are warning the public about a cougar in south Langley after one of their young cows was killed early Sunday morning.

The 800-pound heifer was found dead in a pasture on 18 Avenue off of 216 Street, near Campbell Valley Park.

“We could tell it was a cougar because of how the cow was killed and the conservation officer confirmed it,” said Sonja.

A cougar goes after the jugular in the neck of an animal.

In 13 years of farming in the area, the Anderlinis have never lost any of their livestock to wild animals.

“The heifer was killed 150 feet from the house and pool deck,” she said. “We really just want to make south Langley residents aware this happened and that there is a cougar in the area.”

The Conservation Office Service confirmed that it is a cougar and they have set up live traps in the area.

They are saying they don’t believe this cougar is a public safety risk.

This is the only killing of livestock that the COS knows of in Langley.

The Anderlinis think there may have been a cougar passing through their part of Langley a while back when their mares started screaming in the middle of the night. They don’t think they have coyotes near by.

Despite the sad death of the yearling, Sonja doesn’t want people to fear going to Campbell Valley Park or anywhere else in south Langley.

“Be aware of your surroundings and know what to do if you do see a cougar, but don’t let this stop you from living life,” she said.

Cougars rarely go after horses, but it is advised to keep smaller livestock like goats,  llamas and sheep inside at night.

To report a conflict with wildlife that threatens public safety call 1-877-952-7277.

The following are guidelines from the Conservation Office in the event that you do encounter a cougar:

◦    Stay calm and keep the cougar in view.  Pick up children immediately – children frighten easily, the noise and movements they make could provoke an attack.  Back away slowly, ensuring that the animal has a clear avenue of escape.  Make yourself look as large as possible.  Keep the cougar in front of you at all times.

•    Never run or turn your back on a cougar.  Sudden movement may provoke an attack.

•    If a cougar shows interest or follows you, respond aggressively.  Maintain eye contact with the cougar, show your teeth and make loud noise.  Arm yourself with rocks or sticks as weapons.  Crouch down as little as possible when bending down to pick up things off of the ground.

•    If a cougar attacks, fight back.  Convince the cougar you are a threat and not prey.  Use anything you can as a weapon.  Focus your attack on the cougar’s face and eyes.