Trial for accused drug traffickers with alleged gang ties set for June 2016

Two alleged senior members of Aldergrove's 856 gang facing multiple charges related to 2014 bust

Langley RCMP

Three days have been set aside for the trial of two alleged senior members of the 856 gang in connection with drug trafficking activities in Langley.

But the trial, to take place in provincial court in Surrey, won’t happen until June 2016.

Leonard Pelletier, 48, faces five counts of possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking and one count of willfully resisting or obstructing and officer.

Jason Francis Wallace, 26, is charged with six counts of possession of a controlled substance for the purpose of trafficking.

Neither man is in custody.

In July 2014, Wallace and Pelletier were arrested and B.C.’s gang unit shut down a drug making facility at a mansion on an acreage in Langley.

The Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit seized $400,000 worth of cocaine, meth, heroin, oxycontin and a large quantity of drug-making paraphernalia from a 10,000-square-foot home in the 4600 block of 236 Street.

The rented home, which was cut up into apartments, housed a 20-tonne press to make cocaine bricks, along with other illicit drugs and paraphernalia. Among the drugs, police seized 44 kg of super buffer, which is used to dilute cocaine so sellers can “double their profit.”

The buffer was actually pig dewormer. The July seizure was one of the largest CFSEU has carried out and police believe this will put a big dent in the 856 gang’s business and operations.

Charges against the two weren’t laid until June 2015.

The 856 gang, named after the telephone prefix for Aldergrove, started a decade ago “as a bunch of young punks and thugs in Aldergrove doing street-level drug dealing,” said CFSEU Staff Sgt. Lindsey Houghton.

But they have grown and continue to recruit new members from Aldergrove, he confirmed.

They aren’t at the level of other gangs  in the area like the Red Scorpions, but have become the dominant drug trafficking gang in the Yukon, Yellowknife, NWT, parts of Alberta and northern B.C.

“They will muscle their way into a market that is kind of untapped and take it over,” said Houghton.