The 'Accept Me' logo which adorns clothing and accessories started as a kernel in Kim Radons's mind last summer on her Aldergrove farm and has since grown to take the Grammy Awards stage in Los Angeles.

Accept Me fashions off to Grammy Awards

The "Accept Me" logo which adorns clothing and accessories started as a kernel in Kim Radons's mind last summer

A philanthropic fashion line that takes aim at bullying is becoming a sensation.

The “Accept Me” logo which adorns clothing and accessories started as a kernel in Kim Radons’s mind last summer on her Aldergrove farm and has since grown to take the Grammy Awards stage in Los Angeles.

“I started this brand because I firmly believe we should all be accepted for ‘who I am, how I look, whom I love, and what I believe’. Individually we desire acceptance, yet we are falling short in the reciprocation department,” says founder Kim Radons.

She had been dealing with some “profoundly painful” issues around her work as a children’s advocate, “and then at the end of June it hit me, we need one platform — acceptance — and it takes care of all of that bullying, racism, and negativity in the world.”

Radons had the idea for a logo and called on an artist friend in Quebec, Colleen Reich, to come up with the final logo design. It depicts a person breaking through the barriers of marginalization.

“There’s a bit of nostalgia with a peace sign in the design, along with breaking through the barriers.”

The T-shirts, sterling silver necklaces and jewelry are currently only available on the website www.acceptme.ca although Radons is working on getting it into stores as well.

To that end she got a big break when the upcoming 58th annual Grammy Awards accepted her bid to have the Accept Me products included in their swag bags.

“I thought it was a long shot but I wrote the smallest pitch to the Grammy Awards and got the quickest response. Within 15 minutes they called me and said they loved the message.”

Support of Accept Me branded merchandise enables the organization to provide funds to select charities that share their primary goal of empowering positive growth in the lives of at risk youth.

Accept Me supports the work of two organizations, Bullying Ends Here and Boys Club Network.

“I found Bullying Ends Here when I was looking for help groups. Its founder, Tad, is a police officer who lectures at high schools and I listened to him talk to grades 9-10 at a West Vancouver school. We were all spellbound,” said Radons.

Radons and husband, Roy, have been involved with Boys Club Network for the past four years, and every summer the couple hosts 75 youths from BCN at their farm for activities and a wiener roast.

“For those of us who grew up on farms it may not seem anything special but for these kids it’s their very first exposure to what a farm is.”

Their websites are http://www.bullyingendshere.ca/ and http://www.boysclubnetwork.com/

“Acceptance is not just something that happens, it is a lifelong choice that requires one to be consistent and constant in their practice of compassion and empathy. Together we can share this simple yet powerful message. It’s a movement, a small adjustment, and it starts with you,” said Radons. “Visit our ‘Friends’ page to learn more about the charities we love.”

To learn more about Accept Me and the Accept Me movement, visit the website: www.acceptme.ca or on Social Media: Instagram acceptme_movement; Twitter accept_me_; Facebook www.facebook.com/acceptmemovement/; Pinterest Accept Me.

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