On Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 26th and 27th, the Township of Langley and Langley City will team up to present the annual Household Hazardous Waste Plus Collection Event. (File)

Drop-off event returns for Saturday, Oct. 26 weekend

Langley City and Township residents can dispose of toxic household waste and dangerous items

A no-cost, one-stop, drop-off event that will keep toxic household waste and dangerous items from harming people, pets, and the environment will return later this month.

On Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 26th and 27th, the Township of Langley and Langley City will team up to present the annual Household Hazardous Waste Plus Collection Event. From 9:00am to 3:00pm, teams of municipal staff and industry representatives will be at the Township’s Operations Centre, at 4700 – 224 Street, to collect materials ranging from paint, cleaning agents, pesticides, and automotive fluids, to electronics, small appliances, batteries, and items containing mercury.

READ MORE: VIDEO: More take part in annual hazardous waste collection weekend in the Langleys

READ MORE: Residents recycle 45 tonnes of toxic material during drop-off event

The HHW drop-off event is free and open to those living in Langley Township or City. Proof of residency is required and visitors must be in a vehicle, as those on foot cannot be accommodated. Only household quantities can be taken, and items or quantities meant for commercial use will not be accepted. A full list of items being collected at the event can be found at tol.ca/hhw, along with information on properly disposing of household hazardous waste all year long.

“This is our 19th annual drop-off event, and after almost two decades, people have become more aware of the need to care for our environment and practice responsible stewardship,” said Township of Langley Solid Waste Coordinator Debbie Fleming. “This convenient event gives the public peace of mind, knowing that these toxic, corrosive, flammable, and reactive materials are being safely and properly disposed of. Hazardous waste items – anything with a warning symbol on the label – should never be left in your home, garage, or yard, as they can leach into our soil and water supplies, or harm the people or animals they come in contact with.”

Hazardous waste items are not accepted in municipal waste collection and should never be dumped down drains and sewers, buried, thrown in the garbage, or dumped illegally.

While the municipalities are pleased to present the annual drop-off event, Fleming reminds residents they need not wait for the Household Hazardous Waste Plus Collection Event: they can avoid the line-up and prevent restricted materials from accumulating by properly disposing of them year-round. Antifreeze, fluorescent lights, solvents, and automobile tires are just some of the many items that can be brought to local take-back depots. For locations, visit rcbc.ca.

The Household Hazardous Waste Plus Collection Event has also become an excellent opportunity for residents to help others in need in their community. Donations of non-perishable food items for the Langley Food Bank will be gratefully accepted during the drop-off.

Last year, Fleming said, Langley residents generously donated about 11 large blue boxes full of thoughtful food items.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Teacher parades connect staff to student families during quarantines

Half a dozen Langley elementary schools have held similar events

Cops for Cancer hoping tour still on as spring fundraising suspended

Tour de Valley riders from the Fraser Valley are waiting for the all-clear

WEATHER: Clear skies, windy near the water in Langley

Temperatures to reach a high of 11 C

Bowen Byram makes all-star, again

Vancouver Giants defenceman recognized for second year in a row

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

Logan Boulet Effect: Green Shirt Day calls on Canadians to become organ donors

While social distancing, the day also honours the 16 lives lost in the 2018 Humboldt Broncos Crash

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

B.C. wide burning restrictions come into effect April 16

‘Larger open burns pose an unnecessary risk and could detract from wildfire detection’

B.C. secures motel, hotel rooms for COVID-19 shelter space

Community centres, rooms reserved for pandemic self-isolation

Look at hospitalizations, not recovery stats for COVID-19, B.C. professor says

Cases in hospital are a definitive count of people who have the novel coronavirus

B.C. First Nations want to launch fight of Trans Mountain pipeline approval

Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada decided not to hear five challenges about the pipeline

Most Read