New signage featuring the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ dialect was unveiled at KPU’s Langley campus on Monday, Nov.8. (From left) Dr. Alan Davis, Kwantlen Polytechnic University President and Vice-Chancellor, Fern Gabriel, Kwantlen First Nation and Langley School District, Cheryl Gabriel, Kwantlen First Nation, Donna Gabriel, Kwantlen First Nation, Val van den Broek, Mayor of the City of Langley, and Herman Ho, Kwantlen Polytechnic University Interior Designer. (KPU photo)

New signage featuring the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ dialect was unveiled at KPU’s Langley campus on Monday, Nov.8. (From left) Dr. Alan Davis, Kwantlen Polytechnic University President and Vice-Chancellor, Fern Gabriel, Kwantlen First Nation and Langley School District, Cheryl Gabriel, Kwantlen First Nation, Donna Gabriel, Kwantlen First Nation, Val van den Broek, Mayor of the City of Langley, and Herman Ho, Kwantlen Polytechnic University Interior Designer. (KPU photo)

Signs in First Nations language go up at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Langley

‘It’s beyond joy, what I’m feeling’ at sight of signs: Kwantlen First Nation member

Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) has started installing signage bearing indigenous language as part of its reconciliation efforts.

The new signage featuring the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ dialect was unveiled at KPU’s Langley campus on Monday, Nov. 18 by university president Dr. Alan Davis and Fern Gabriel, a member of the Kwantlen First Nation, with her sisters Cheryl and Donna and Langley City Mayor Val van den Broek also present.

Gabriel says there’s no direct translation into English of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ words that describe her happiness at seeing the dialect appearing on signage at university.

“It’s beyond joy, what I’m feeling today,” she said.

“I thank you all for this day. It is history.”

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Gabriel, who teaches the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ dialect in the Langley School District, translated the words that appear on the signage, which also features art by KPU graduate Brandon Gabriel, a mixed media artist and member of the Kwantlen First Nation.

Davis said the signage is a “step on the path to ensuring that the traditional, ancestral lands of the First Nations people in KPU’s region are properly acknowledged at all our campuses. It is also part of a much wider and deeper effort by KPU to address the Calls to Action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report of 2015.

He praised Gabriel, saying her “wisdom and insight have been invaluable as we try to make KPU more welcoming to all indigenous learners, employees and guests.”

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The signage uses Brandon Gabriel’s original design of the salmon and the wolf, which forms part of KPU’s coat of arms.

“As a graduate of KPU, I am happy that this effort to respect the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ dialect on university campuses is taking place,” Brandon Gabriel commented.

“To have such a sought-after language knowledge-keeper like Kwantlen First Nation’s Fern Gabriel (a.k.a. Sesməlot) to provide her input is tremendous.

“This language recognition will provide an anchor for the university community to bring more understanding and importance of local Indigenous people and history.”

The language panel has a Thunderbird design by Sehmiamoo First Nation artist Roxanne Charles.

More signage featuring the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ dialect will be installed at KPU’s Surrey campus this week.

KPU’s Richmond, Tech and Civic Plaza campuses will also have indigenous signage installed in due course.

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