Sedums can add texture and colour to the garden, while being low maintenance and drought tolerant, including this Autumn Joy about to bloom. (Pam Erikson/Special to the Langley Advance)

GREEN THUMB: Langley gardener suggests a few climate evolving plants

Columnist Pam Erikson has a strong appreciation for the drought-tolerant sedums.

’Tis the season for sedums.

As we peruse our dry and dusty garden, it is evident which plants are the survivors in what is becoming our seasonal drought.

While the hardy perennials will simply go dormant from stress, new growth returning with the awaited fall rains, there is one group of plants that still look fabulous – the sedums and sempervivums.

Both sedums and sempervivums like hot weather, and will tolerate drought for weeks on end.

Planting in full sun location where you would like some colour, and not have to worry about, make them ideal.

There are a plethora of sedum varieties available, with new ones added all the time.

The always popular Autumn Joy has been a big favourite in many gardens for years with its lush succulent foliage throughout the spring and summer, and clusters of pink blooms in late summer-early fall. An added bonus to these plants is that the bees just love them!

Easy to care for, the only real attention they require is a trimming in June. Keep in mind for sedums – June prune.

If the plant is about a foot tall, I trim off about a third. This stimulates multiple stems of new growth from where you cut, thus giving you a thicker more sturdy plant and resulting in much more dense flowering.

Two of my personal favourite sedums are Madrona and Postman’s Pride – both with deeper red foliage that are standouts.

They are both taller growing varieties (about 12 to 18 inches tall) and are such wonderful reliable garden plants.

There are also many lower growing, ground cover varieties – Sunsparkler Firecracker with its deep red foliage and Sunsparkler Lime Twister being two that we love.

There are several new blended varieties being created here in B.C. that are also outstanding and being used for living roof situations, so keep an eye out for those.

Being perennials, most sedums will die down for the winter when you can then cut right back, returning in spring with vigorous, fresh new growth.

As for the sempervivums, commonly referred to as Hens and Chicks, these extremely hardy plants stay evergreen for the winter in our area.

They enjoy the same sunny dry conditions as the sedums, and being ground covers, make excellent container plants for low shallow pots.

Since our weather pattern seems to be changing towards a drier climate, our gardens will have to adjust – so consider some sedums and sempervivums, to not only enhance the colour in your garden, but to conserve our water.

– Pam Erikson is owner of Erikson’s Daylily Gardens and Perennials

and president of the Langley Garden Club.

.

Read her previous column: Lilies bloom for summer in Langley

 

Sedums can add texture and colour to the garden, while being low maintenance and drought tolerant, including these Firecracker and dLime Twister varieties. (Pam Erikson/Special to the Langley Advance)

Sedums can add texture and colour to the garden, while being low maintenance and drought tolerant, including this Firecracker variety. (Pam Erikson/Special to the Langley Advance)

Just Posted

Junior Team Canada brings home gold to the Lower Mainland, again

In a 9-4 victory over Switzerland, a Langley-based curling team earned its 2nd straight world title

Surrey-Langley curlers in the running again for gold

Junior men’s team out of Langley hopes to defend its world title Sunday, going up against Switzerland

VIDEO: Giants earn 40th victory in a 4-0 triumph over Victoria

Vancouver G-Men move within a point of clinching the B.C. division banner at Friday’s at-home game

Developers to unveil plan to transform Aldergrove mall into new town centre

Community to find out new Aldergrove Town Centre plan for dormant 10-acre lot in heart of downtown.

Man sentenced for smuggling drugs and shooting at border guards

Nathan Hall was arrested in Abbotsford in 2013 after day-long manhunt

VIDEO: Iconic ‘snow cone’ takes shape at B.C. park near Clearwater

Snow cone forming at Wells Gray Provincial Park one that would make Disney’s Queen Elsa proud

Legislation to protect B.C. farmland comes into effect

Regulations enhance food security, encourage long-term farming

Have you heard the legend of Shuswaggi, the Shuswap Lake monster?

Witness accounts as old as 1904, and as recent as 2018, place a creature in the lake’s depths

UPDATE: B.C. ticket holder winner of $25.9-million Lotto Max jackpot

Next draw set for Mar. 1 with an estimated jackpot of $10 million

People gather for funeral of seven children killed in fast-moving Halifax fire

Traditional portion of the service will be followed by words from community members

B.C. weavers to help Alaska Native project honouring survivors of violence

Dozens of Chilkat and Ravenstail weavers from all over North America will be weaving 5-inch-by-5-inch squares

B.C. skip Sarah Wark and team eliminated at Scotties Tournament of Hearts

Nontheless pretty impressive stuff from the 24th-ranked team in the country

Pope’s sex abuse prevention summit explained

It’s A high-stakes meeting designed to impress on Catholic bishops the global problem

Girl heard saying ‘Help my Dad’ in suspicious radio message on Vancouver Island

Police asking for help following mysterious signals from somewhere between Comox and Sayward

Most Read