Keep Halloween safe by avoiding open flames and using battery operated tea lights to illuminate pumpkins and decorations

Tips help keep Halloween safe

It is the scariest kind of real-life Halloween story, but this one has a happy ending.

It is the scariest kind of real-life Halloween story, but this one has a happy ending.

A few years ago, a little girl was out trick or treating in Langley when the unthinkable happened: her costume came into contact with a jack-o-lantern and the candle inside set the material on fire.

She was only five years old, but when the flames started consuming her clothes, the child knew exactly what to do: she stopped immediately, dropped to the ground, covered her face with her hands, and rolled over and over to put out the flames.

While she had quite the scare, the young girl wasn’t injured, thanks to information she learned and practiced with Township of Langley firefighters. The stop, drop, and roll technique is taught to local school children by the Fire Department, along with other fire safety information, and Public Fire and Life Safety Educator Krista Barton said it is really rewarding to hear children are putting the potentially life-saving lessons to use.

“It only takes a few seconds to make a huge difference,” said Barton, who encourages parents to review the procedure with their kids and ensure they practice. “It is how they remember and learn,” she said, noting that children as young as three can benefit from fire safety lessons, such as how to recognize and respond to smoke alarms.

And with Halloween fast approaching, now is the time to take precautions and think about safety, to keep everyone in the family free from harm.

“Halloween should be spooky fun, not dangerous,” Barton said, adding that the worst offenders are open flames. Battery operated tea lights are the safest way to illuminate jack-o-lanterns. Those who insist on real candles should put them in proper containers such as jars, not leave them loose in the pumpkin, and keep them away from doors, walkways, and other areas where trick or treaters congregate.

Ensure all decorations are kept away from open flames and other heat sources like light bulbs and heaters. Dried flowers, cornstalks, and crepe paper catch fire very quickly. Remember to keep exits clear of decorations, so nothing blocks escape routes.

When dressed up, children should be able to walk freely in their costume and carry a flashlight or glow stick to enhance their visibility. Avoid long trailing fabrics and ensure eye holes in masks are large enough to see out of properly.

Make sure all smoke alarms in the home are working, and if children are going to a Halloween party at someone else’s place, tell them to look for ways to get out and have a plan in case of an emergency.

For more information, call the Township of Langley Fire Department at 604-532-7500.

Just Posted

Aldergrove shop owners make downtown more inviting

Business owners rejuvenate storefronts and invite redevelopment of the town’s core

LETTER: How do you define heritage in Fort Langley

A letter writer speaks out against demolition of several buildings in the ‘birthplace of B.C.’

Korean traditions with a mix of jazz

Black String plays Summer Festival Series at Willoughby Amphitheatre

Luxury car exporter claims Langley developers never paid back $300,000 loan

A lawsuit has been filed against two senior officials of the Newmark Group of Companies

VIDEO: Liberal MP doles out special recognition to Langley area volunteers

Fifteen Langley City and Cloverdale residents were lauded for their community contributions

‘Bad choices make good stories’: Margaret Trudeau brings her show to Just for Laughs

Trudeau says over the decades she has been suicidal, manic, depressed

Garneau ‘disappointed’ in airlines’ move against new passenger bill of rights

New rules codified compensation for lost luggage, overbooked flights

Mercury tops out on top of the world: Alert in Nunavut warmer than Victoria

It’s the latest anomaly in what’s been a long, hot summer across the Arctic

Canadian is detained in China on drug allegations: Chinese government

Detention of a Canadian in China comes as part a diplomatic dispute triggered by arrest of Huawei exec Meng Wanzhou

Too much time on social media can hurt teens’ mental health: study

Researchers conducted a four-year survey of more than 3,800 adolescents between Grades 7 and 11

Advocates want charges in horse deaths during Calgary Stampede chuckwagon races

Chuckwagon races are a nightly spectacle during the Stampede, a 10-day annual celebration of western life

ICBC insurance renewals get more complicated this year

Crash history, driver risk prompt more reporting requirements

Diversity a Canadian strength, Trudeau says of Trump tweets at congresswomen

Trudeau avoided using Trump’s name when he was asked about the president’s Twitter comments

B.C. couple bring son home from Nigeria after long adoption delay

Kim and Clark Moran of Abbotsford spent almost a year waiting to finalize adoption of Ayo, 3

Most Read