On Monday, June 28, Langley Advance Times reader Karen Roeck proved it was literally hot enough to fry an egg outdoors. (Special to Langley Advance Times)

On Monday, June 28, Langley Advance Times reader Karen Roeck proved it was literally hot enough to fry an egg outdoors. (Special to Langley Advance Times)

Yes, you really can fry an egg in this heat

Walnut Grove resident has the proof

It really is that hot.

On Monday, June 28, Langley Advance Times reader Karen Roeck proved it was literally hot enough on her back deck sun room in Walnut Grove to fry an egg.

And she took a photo to show it.

”This ‘nature’ fried egg might be of interest to your readers as we all endure this heatwave,” Roeck commented.

She described for the Langley Advance Times how she left the frying pan in the sun room for about 30 minutes to heat up, then cracked the egg.

Roeck called the heat “insane” and explained that neither she, nor her husband, or two kids, were spending any time in the sun room, but staying in the air-conditioned part of their house.

It was the hottest day yet in a record-breaking heat wave that has set all-time records, forced businesses and schools to shut down, and taken a toll on humans and animals alike.

READ ALSO: ‘It breaks my heart:’ heat wave taking a toll on pets, Langley vet clinic staffer warns

Environment Canada has issued both heat warnings and air quality warnings.

READ ALSO: 140-year heat record shattered in Chilliwack Saturday

BC Hydro said that there were a few things people could do to keep homes as cool as possible:

  • Closing drapes and blinds, which can block up to 65 per cent of the heat.
  • Keeping doors and windows shut to keep cooler air in and warm air out.
  • Using a fan, which costs just $7 a day to run
  • Purchasing Energy Star air conditioners, which they say use up to 40 per cent less power than other units.
  • Smaller appliances such as microwaves, crockpots or a toaster over to avoid the heat produced by larger appliances like the oven.

Fraser Health, the province’s largest health authority, offered tips on how to spot the early warning sighs of heat stroke:

  • Dizziness and fainting
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Rapid breathing and heartbeat
  • Extreme thirst
  • Decreased urination with unusually dark urine
  • High body temperature
  • Lack of coordination.

While everyone should stay safe in the heat, Fraser Health said that some people are at higher risk including:

  • Older adults
  • Infants and young kids
  • People with chronic illnesses including cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, renal disease or psychiatric illness
  • People who are physically impaired, especially those who are confined to bed, need assistances with daily living or have sensory or cognitive impairments.
  • People taking certain medications, including high blood pressure medicines, antidepressants, antipsychotics or Parkinson’s medication.
  • People who are socially disadvantaged due to low income, being homeless or living alone.
  • Newcomers to Canada.
  • Occupational groups who work out-doors or who have increased physical strain.
  • People who are physically active with increased physical strain with a reduced perception of risk.


Is there more to the story? Email: dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

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