Derby Reach Brae Island Parks Association (DRBIPA) is hosting a digital scavenger hunt photo contest in lieu of usual spring or summer programming. (Derby Reach Brae Island Parks Association/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Derby Reach Brae Island Parks Association (DRBIPA) is hosting a digital scavenger hunt photo contest in lieu of usual spring or summer programming. (Derby Reach Brae Island Parks Association/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

From moss to spring blossoms, Langley is invited to share photos for nature-themed contest

Derby Reach Brae Island Parks Association hosts online scavenger hunt from now until June 30

Derby Reach Brae Island Parks Association (DRBIPA) is hosting a digital scavenger hunt photo contest in lieu of usual spring or summer programming.

From now until June 30, DRBIPA will be sending weekly callouts for sightings of eight particular natural wonders to members, volunteers, and social media followers.

People are invited to post original photos – matching the photo callouts – on Instagram or Facebook and tag @DRBIPA.

Photo callouts will go out on the DRBIPA Facebook event pages and in their newsletter throughout the next month.

Anyone who responds with a match to any of the eight photo callouts by June 30th, will be entered into a draw to win one of three prizes – $25 gift certificates to Lee’s Market in Fort Langley.

The photos shared can be of current walks at Derby Reach (please note Brae Island is temporarily closed due to COVID-19 precautions) or past shots collected from these parks or other parks, or from anywhere in the province and beyond.

Each eligible photo post will count as one entry into the contest.

READ MORE: Provincial parks to reopen amid COVID-19 in time for Victoria Day long weekend

Photo Callout #1 MOSS

“Mosses, or the taxonomic division Bryophyta, are small, non-vascular flowerless plants that typically form dense green clumps or mats, often in damp or shady locations. A lot of mosses in our region are currently developing sporophytes with unbranched stalks topped with single capsules containing spores,” explained the DRBIPA.

Photo Callout #2 SPRING BLOSSOMS

“Plants blossom at different times because of many factors, the weather, temperature and the amount of sunlight the plant receives…but it often all comes down to one singular gene and an internal circadian clock. Flowers bloom to attract insects that pollinate and fertilize the growing fruits and seeds, it is their reproductive process,” the DRBIPA noted.

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