Terri-Lynne McClintic, convicted in the death of 8-year-old Woodstock, Ont., girl Victoria Stafford, is escorted into court in Kitchener, Ont., on Wednesday, September 12, 2012 for her trial in an assault on another inmate while in prison. The father of a young girl who was brutally murdered says one of her killers who was spending time in an Indigenous healing lodge is back in prison. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Geoff Robins

McClintic back in prison after time in healing lodge, Tori Stafford’s father says

Terri-Lynne McClintic pleaded guilty to the 2009 abduction, rape and murder of Tori Stafford, an eight-year-old girl from Woodstock, Ont.

A convicted child killer who became the subject of national outrage when it was learned she’d been transferred to an Indigenous healing lodge is back in prison, the father of her young victim said Thursday.

Rodney Stafford issued a brief, celebratory Facebook post announcing that Terri-Lynne McClintic was no longer at the Saskatchewan lodge, but offered no other details.

“It’s official!!! Terri-Lynne is back behind bars,” Stafford wrote in the post.

McClintic pleaded guilty to the 2009 abduction, rape and murder of Tori Stafford, an eight-year-old girl from Woodstock, Ont.

McClintic’s testimony against Michael Rafferty, her boyfriend at the time of the slaying, helped convict him in Tori’s death. Both McClintic and Rafferty were sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.

The federal government came under intense fire when it surfaced that McClintic had been transferred from a traditional prison to the Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge in Saskatchewan, which is managed by the Correctional Service of Canada and is listed as a medium-security institution for women.

Rodney Stafford had expressed outrage at the transfer and called for it to be reversed.

READ MORE: Transferring prisoners to healing lodges to be restricted, Goodale says

On Wednesday, Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale announced changes that would make it more difficult for prisoners serving long sentences to be moved to healing lodges.

Under the new rules, prisoners won’t be eligible for transfers to healing lodges without secured perimeters until they’re into the “preparation for release” phases of their sentences.

The Correctional Service of Canada will also have to consider inmates’ behaviour and how close they are to being eligible for unescorted temporary absences from prison before transferring them.

In addition, the deputy commissioner for women will be involved in decisions to ensure national standards are applied consistently and relevant factors are considered.

Goodale said the changes will apply to past and future cases.

He said healing lodges still have a role to play in the correctional system but acknowledged a need for more public education in how prisoner decisions get made.

“These are decisions that are not taken lightly or capriciously,” he said. ”They are based on evidence and sound principles, and there needs to be a higher level of understanding of that.”

In addition, there must be more meaningful and useful communication with victims given the anguish they have suffered, he said.

“They need to know that their perspective is being properly respected.”

Michelle McQuigge , The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Langley affordable housing projects get provincial money

Community Housing Fund money to build 191 homes for families, seniors and people with disabilities

Abbotsford murder victim identified as Jagvir Malhi

Police say killing linked to Lower Mainland gang conflict

Langley driver victorious at California

Fifth win in GT3-class SCCA National Championship Runoffs for Collin Jackson

BC Ferries passengers wait to leave Vancouver Island after Remembrance Day

Traffic aboard BC Ferries slows after Remembrance Day long weekend

One person sent to hospital after incident at Langley gas station

Police observed retrieving what appeared to be an exacto knife

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Kuhnhackl scores 2 odd goals as Isles dump Canucks 5-2

Vancouver drops second game in two nights

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Disabled boy has ‘forgiven’ bullies who walked on him in stream, mom says

A Cape Breton teen who has cerebral palsy was told to lie in a stream as other kids walked over him

Letters shed light on state of mind of B.C. mom accused of daughter’s murder

Trial of South Surrey mother Lisa Batstone begins in BC Supreme Court

Most Read