Drinking Chocolate

Drinking Chocolate

Luxury beverage perfect for sipping

  • Jan. 6, 2020 11:45 a.m.

– Story by Gail Johnson Photography by Don Denton

With its bracing cold and damp days, winter seems to call for comfort in the form of chocolate. While there’s everyday hot chocolate, like the powdered stuff you find at skating rinks and ski hills, pure drinking chocolate is a whole other experience. Not the packaged product you grew up with, this refined beverage is luxury in a mug.

One sip may have you nodding in agreement with Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes, who in 1519 described chocolate this way: “The divine drink, which builds up resistance and fights fatigue. A cup of this precious drink permits a man to walk for a whole day without food.”

Here are a few places to find fine drinking chocolate in Greater Vancouver.

Mink Chocolates:

Makers of bars that have won multiple awards from Best Chocolatiers and Confectioners in America, Mink crafts sumptuous European-style drinking chocolate using pure dark and milk chocolate, Bernard Callebaut ganache and just a smidge of milk. Extra-thick and sumptuous, it’s ideal for “chocolate freaks,” says founder Marc Lieberman.

“Hot chocolate as we know it in North America is a very liquid drink,” he says. “You should be able to take a gulp if you want. You would never gulp drinking chocolate. You would probably dunk a biscotti in it or a churro or another pastry. You would sip it. If you waited too long and it cooled down, you would take a spoon to finish it off. Or you’d take half of it home and put it on ice cream.”

For a vegan option, Mink’s three locations offer a drinking chocolate made of oat milk and coconut-cream ganache with 74 per cent extra-dark, bitter chocolate.

Gem Chocolates:

The boutique chocolate shop in Kerrisdale prepares its intensely flavoured drinking chocolate from chocolate couverture, not syrups or mixes. It uses French Valrhona chocolate (62 per cent cocoa for dark and 34 per cent cocoa for milk) and Casa Luker Cumbre chocolate (58 per cent cocoa, sugar-free, Colombian origin).

For another layer of sipping sensation, you can add rose water, orange blossom or holiday spices. To go with it (or just to go), consider some of the glossy individual chocolates in wildly unconventional flavours, such as saffron chai; cinnamon and roasted pear; black garlic and balsamic syrup; and licorice and raspberry.

Koko Monk Chocolates:

Pastry chef Paul Dincer makes Koko Monk’s bean-to-bar chocolate on-site, using unprocessed heirloom cacao beans and raw, unprocessed sugar. The chocolate lounge’s drinking chocolate comes in 16 distinct and daring flavours. The fragrant Istanbul Blues, for instance, earthy and exotic, consists of 74 per cent Venezuelan dark chocolate with ground wild orchid bulb. Sin and Salvation, meanwhile, is floral and refreshing, with 35 per cent single-origin white chocolate and organic lavender, fig and chamomile. For adult chocolate-lovers: the Brunette Bangle features curry and a hint of coconut liquor.

Chez Christophe Chocolaterie Patisserie:

Award-winning pastry chef Christophe Bonzon, one of a handful of Canadian ambassadors of Cacao Berry, a premium French brand, brings a taste of Switzerland to the West Coast. With two locations, Chez Christophe serves a classic drinking chocolate created with three simple ingredients: a custom blend of 38 per cent milk and 63.6 per cent dark chocolate and steamed milk (or a non-dairy alternative on request). The chocolate is crushed on-site, ensuring that it melts easily and evenly into the warm milk, making for a rich, well-balanced and not overly sweet liquid treat.

East Van Roasters:

Situated in Gastown’s historic Rainier Hotel and operated by the Portland Hotel Society Community Services Society, East Van Roasters is a social enterprise that supports at-risk women who are re-entering the work force. The café crafts artisan, organic, bean-to-bar chocolate and coffee, both of which are roasted and prepared on-site.

The source of its single-origin, ganache-based drinking chocolates changes regularly, with Tanzanian chocolate currently on offer; warming spices are infused in this Mayan-spiced version. Made with steamed organic Avalon milk, the velvety drinks are sweetened with honey from Hives for Humanity, a non-profit organization in the Downtown Eastside. Vegans can sip on a version made with organic coconut milk and agave.

Temper Pastry:

West Vancouver-based chocolatier and pâtissier Steven Hodge has a knack for truffles, tarts and chocolate sculptures — the rounded teddy bears being a signature piece. Temper’s drinking chocolate consists of one part Valrhona chocolate (milk or dark) with three parts steamed milk. Enhance the indulgence with a Charlie Bite, a kind of pull-apart cinnamon roll named after Hodge’s daughter, or laminated ultra-buttery brioche.

Ladurée:

A luxury French patisserie founded in Paris in 1862, Ladurée made its Vancouver debut in 2016 with its Robson Street tea salon. Known for elegant macarons in flavours ranging from rose to raspberry, the upscale spot with golden gilding also makes silky smooth drinking chocolate with Valrhona Guanaja 70 per cent chocolate, served with an optional side of Chantilly cream. Extraordinaire.

Story courtesy of Boulevard Magazine, a Black Press Media publication

Like Boulevard Magazine on Facebook and follow them on Instagram

Food and Drink

Just Posted

Shortreed Elementary received $40,000 from the Indigo Love of Reading foundation to purchase new books. (Special to The Star)
VIDEO: Shortreed one of 30 Canadian schools aided by Indigo’s Love of Reading program

Aldergrove school received $40,000, which will be put towards new books for the library

Students staged a flash mob on the last day of dancing at Lisa’s School of Dance in Langley City on Saturday, June 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
VIDEO: Final dances held at Lisa Dew’s dance school in Langley City

After 35 years, the school has been forced to close due to the bottom-line impact of the pandemic

Jessica Horst, a volunteer with the Bertrand Creek Enhancement Society, picked Scotch Broom at Jackman Wetlands on Wednesday night. (Lisa Dreves/Special to The Star)
Scotch broom removal a big task six years in the making at Jackman Wetlands

Volunteers filled a truck-full of invasive shrub growing rampant in Aldergrove park

Health and safety protocols for arriving international travellers are strict and don’t consider reasons for travel, says a letter writer. (Black Press Media files)
LETTER: Langley performer irked by ever-changing, inconsistent COVID rules

Letter writer feels she had not choice but to move to Mexico to ride out pandemic

A fawn separated from his mother by a well-meaning homeowner in Maple Ridge is a cautionary tale, say Conservation officers and staff at Langley’s Critter Care wildlife sanctuary. (Critter Care/Special to the Langley Advance Times)
Maple Ridge fawn in Langley wildlife sanctuary after separation from mother

Wildlife officials say moving a fawn is not a good idea

Marco Mendicino, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship during a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, May 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada to welcome 45,000 refugees this year, says immigration minister

Canada plans to increase persons admitted from 23,500 to 45,000 and expedite permanent residency applications

FILE – Most lanes remain closed at the Peace Arch border crossing into the U.S. from Canada, where the shared border has been closed for nonessential travel in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Thursday, May 7, 2020, in Blaine, Wash. The restrictions at the border took effect March 21, while allowing trade and other travel deemed essential to continue. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Feds to issue update on border measures for fully vaccinated Canadians, permanent residents

Border with U.S. to remain closed to most until at least July 21

A portion of the George Road wildfire burns near Lytton, B.C. in this Friday, June 18, 2021 handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, BC Wildfire Service *MANDATORY CREDIT*
Blaze near Lytton spread across steep terrain, says BC Wildfire Service

Fire began Wednesday and is suspected to be human-caused, but remains under investigation

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

(Black Press Media files)
Burnaby RCMP look for witnesses in hit-and-run that left motorcyclist dead

Investigators believe that the suspect vehicle rear-ended the motorcycle before fleeing the scene

Blair Lebsack, owner of RGE RD restaurant, poses for a portrait in the dining room, in Edmonton, Friday, June 18, 2021. Canadian restaurants are having to find ways to deal with the rising cost of food. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
Canadian restaurateurs grapple with rising food costs, menu prices expected to rise

Restaurants are a low margin industry, so there’s not a lot of room to work in additional costs

RCMP crest. (Black Press Media files)
Fort St. John man arrested after allegedly inviting sexual touching from children

Two children reported the incident to a trusted adult right away

Barbara Violo, pharmacist and owner of The Junction Chemist Pharmacy, draws up a dose behind vials of both Pfizer-BioNTech and Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines on the counter, in Toronto, Friday, June 18, 2021. An independent vaccine tracker website founded by a University of Saskatchewan student says just over 20 per cent of eligible Canadians — those 12 years old and above — are now fully vaccinated. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
At least 20% of eligible Canadians fully vaccinated, 75% with one dose: data

Earlier projections for reopening at this milestone didn’t include Delta variant

Most Read