Aldergrove mother Kristyna Worrall and her two children, Luke and Rilynn, were some of the first to take part in photographer Shaylin Thulin’s project showcasing portraits of local families in the midst of social-isolating at home during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Shaylin Thulin photo)

Aldergrove mother Kristyna Worrall and her two children, Luke and Rilynn, were some of the first to take part in photographer Shaylin Thulin’s project showcasing portraits of local families in the midst of social-isolating at home during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Shaylin Thulin photo)

PHOTOS: Aldergrove portrait series captures families ‘new normal’ of isolation at home

Photographer and essential worker, Shaylin Thulin, is celebrating her community during a pandemic

An Aldergrove photographer and essential worker is going the distance to capture families from a distance during the COVID-19 crisis.

Shaylin Thulin is a full-time cashier at a Murrayville grocery store. But this week, during the times she wasn’t on shift, she was perched on the lawn or sidewalk of homes taking pertinent portraits of the people who live in them.

“I never saw it coming,” Thulin, also a professional photographer, said about the changes that swept over Langley soon after the World Health Organization announced the pandemic.

“It’s a new normal,” she said about an era where face masks are commonplace, toilet paper is in short supply, screens are up in front of grocery store clerks, and going out to eat with friends is forbidden.

The first family Aldergrove photographer Shaylin Thulin captured on the doorstep was the Worralls.

Aldergrove mother Kristyna Worrall and her two children, Luke and Rilynn, posed cheekily beside packages of toilet paper and Lysol wipes in their pyjamas.

“When I pulled up to the house, they had the packages of toilet paper outside. It made me laugh,” the photographer said.

She stood back from the lawn to capture the charming moment.

“I’m really enjoying spending the time with my kids,” Worrall later told the Aldergrove Star about her time social distancing at home.

“I normally work quite a bit so the chance to stop and enjoy their childhood is really a blessing in disguise,” mom said about her time with family in self-isolation.

“And my son just thinks it’s great to have me home all day instead of being at daycare,” she related.

[Story continues below photo]

Thulin said it takes anywhere from two to five minutes to take the encapsulating portrait.

For the Worrall household – it was a snapshot of mom holding her smiling boy upside down.

Another Aldergrove family, the Titus clan, was huddled in front of their rancher-style home metres behind their grandparents who inhabit another house on the property.

The older generation kept their distance, and grandpa wore a mask while mowing the lawn. So did grandma while she enjoyed the spring sun.

“They’re both at high risk” of serious complications if they contract the virus, Jocelyn told the Aldergrove Star.

“So I’ve banned them from grocery shopping,” she said, noting that during the outbreak the two households who once made daily visits, now only see each other from afar.

Thulin said taking their family’s portrait during such a time was endearing because “grandpa helped [his daughter] with her lawn.”

[Story continues below photo]

Thulin, herself, is also aiming to stay a safe distance from her parents during the pandemic, who live upstairs from her.

“Me and my sister are both working outside of home,” she explained.

“Even wearing gloves – there’s always that risk.”

Thulin says the doorstep photography project is her way of “adding something positive” to a long list of negatives that have come as a result of the pandemic.

Portraits of positivity

Thulin hopes that when others in the community see the portraits, particularly of families’ resilience during a public health crisis, that the images can serve as a source of hope.

“There’s so much negativity going on right now,” she mourned.

A growing number of Canadian photographers have been making similar house calls – taking free portraits in exchange for quality time capturing those from the comfort of their homes.

Aldergrove’s Dana Begg wore a Township of Langley fire department ball cap during her family’s photo-op to show her support for first responders on the frontline of the crisis.

Begg’s two sons, husband, and dog used their session to recreate a beloved family photo from 2010.

Thulin said what’s surprised her the most about what she’s dubbed the “Doorstep Community Project” is that everyone she meets is still so positive and happy.

“Everyone seems to be making the best out of a bad situation,” she said. “They’ve all been so inviting.”

Interest in the one-week-old project has grown rapidly, she said.

Thulin’s even had families from Abbotsford and Langley City reach out to her about participating.

Those interested in taking part in the community project can email stphotography02@gmail.com and schedule a day and time for their photo session.

Coronavirus

 

Aldergrove mother Kristyna Worrall and her two children, Luke and Rilynn, were some of the first to take part in photographer Shaylin Thulin’s project showcasing portraits of local families in the midst of social-isolating at home during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Shaylin Thulin photo)

Aldergrove mother Kristyna Worrall and her two children, Luke and Rilynn, were some of the first to take part in photographer Shaylin Thulin’s project showcasing portraits of local families in the midst of social-isolating at home during the COVID-19 outbreak. (Shaylin Thulin photo)

Just Posted

Each week, we are asking Langley’s elected officials to weigh in on an issue of concern to local residents. They are given a deadline and invited to respond with a maximum 250 words on the matter. This time, each member of Langley Township council was invited to respond to this question.
AT YOUR SERVICE: Langley trustees applaud positives found amid pandemic

Q&A: Members of the local school board given chance to address the community on a key local issue

Aldergrove journalist Dean Broughton and his father, Bert. (Special to The Star)
Leave it to Aldergrove resident to tell your living legacy

Journalist Dean Broughton found the importance of family stories by conversing with his father

Langley’s Brie King, seen here playing as a TWU Spartan, was a standout for Canada Saturday, June 12, as the team downed Serbia 3-1. (file)
John Diefenbaker and Dwight Eisenhower at the signing of the Columbia River Treaty, January 1961. (White House Photo Office)
Painful Truth: All elections are a roll of the dice

A federal election is coming, and anything could happen

A worker clears out damaged fixtures from a front office of Coast Capital Savings credit union in Brookswood 4145 - 200th Street on Saturday, June 12, after a car knocked out an exterior roof support beam and smashed in a window. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
Car takes out front window of credit union in Brookswood

Witnesses say it happened while the driver was trying to park

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

Most Read