A tunnel boring machine began work in early 2014 drilling a new $240-million water tunnel under the Fraser River to serve growing areas of Surrey and Langley and ensure drinking water supply in an earthquake.

Average home will pay extra $5 to Metro Vancouver

Regional district taxes rise to $427 for typical home in 2015

The average Metro Vancouver household will pay $427 in user fees and taxes to the regional district next year – an extra $5 – as a result of rising utility costs.

The increase was approved by the Metro board Friday and the actual household impact varies somewhat by community because of different apportionment of sewage treatment upgrade costs.

The regional district’s average charge is based on a home assessed at $715,000 and  will be added to 2015 property tax bills along with municipal, school and TransLink taxes.

Metro Vancouver’s $659 million operating budget for 2015 is up 0.8 per cent.

About two thirds of all spending goes to running the drinking water and sewage treatment systems.

Garbage tipping fees will go up $1 to $109 per tonne, but the actual charge to the average household is expected to be flat or slightly lower as a result of increased recycling and less overall disposal of garbage.

However, the regional district is forecasting a $4.4 million shortfall on its waste services next year as a result of the provincial government’s rejection of Metro’s ban on hauling waste out of region.

Each additional truckload of garbage hauled out of the region to take advantage of cheaper disposal alternatives means less tipping fees collected by Metro.

The drop in revenue next year will come out of a $10 million reserve fund, but board chair Greg Moore said that fund will have to be replenished.

The budget includes $7 million to advance Metro’s plan to build a new waste-to-energy plant, despite increased uncertainty as to its viability. Nearly $12 million will also be spent on upgrades at the existing incinerator in Burnaby.

Much of the increased spending is to maintain, upgrade and expand the drinking water and sewage systems.

Major projects that continue in 2015 include a big expansion of the Annacis Island sewage treatment plant and seismic upgrades to the drinking water supply system, including a new $240-million water supply tunnel under the Fraser River to supply growing areas of Surrey and Langley.

Just Posted

McGregor Says: Shopping husbands will survive

Columnist Jim McGregor offers a little advise to those husbands required to go Christmas shopping.

Ring in New Year with ‘Polar Bear Plunge’ at Aldergrove pool

Langley Township welcomes new year with activities for all ages

Langley girl raises $1,685 for BC Children’s Hospital

Aubrielle Bibeau was able to purchase and donate 337 toys to BC Children’s Hospital.

Langley Olympians swim club sets new records at Victoria meet

Club sent 47 swimmers to the 16th annual PCS Christmas Cracker Invitational Swim Meet

An 800-pound pig needs a forever home, Langley animal shelter says

‘Theodore is not destined to be somebody’s bacon’

Man caught on camera allegedly trying to defraud ICBC

Auto-insurer warns B.C. drivers to record info after crashes

Warning issued as forecast calls for 20-foot waves in Tofino

Dangerous waves, strong currents and upper-shoreline flooding expected for Tofino-Ucluelet area

Reindeer will be busy at the zoo in Aldergrove

Christmas holiday fun for families at the Greater Vancouver Zoo

Teenager Alphonso Davies wins Canadian Men’s Soccer Player for the Year Award

Derek Cornelius and Chilliwack native, Jordyn Huitema were named Canadian Youth International Players of the Year

B.C. teen MMA fighter shows heart

Young Unity MMA competitors bring home Ws

Torched-SUV victim ‘had the purest heart,’ says sister

Family of teen found in burned SUV in Surrey appeals for justice

2,000 Canadians died of an overdose in first 6 months of the year

New data from the Public Health Agency of Canada shows the crisis is not subsiding

Another B.C. city votes to ban single-use plastic bags

First six months of proposed ban would focus on education, not enforcement

Most Read