Rev. Lucien Larre of Coquitlam, B.C (Facebook)

B.C. priest is not registered to practise psychology: regulator

Court documents show Larre was suspended by the College of Psychologists of British Columbia in 2006

The College of Psychologists of British Columbia is warning that a Catholic priest is not registered to practise psychology in the province.

The college says it issued the warning about Rev. Lucien Larre of Coquitlam, B.C., in the interest in public safety after it became aware of potentially misleading information circulating about the man’s credentials.

“The college recently became aware of information that had been provided to the public and posted online, which had the potential to mislead members of the public into thinking that Father Larre continued to be registered as a psychologist in British Columbia,” said David Perry, director of policy and external relations for the college in a statement.

Larre is prohibited under the Health Professions Act from working or practising in British Columbia as a “registered psychologist” or a “psychologist” and he is not entitled to use either title to describe his work or in association with any description of his work, Perry said.

Court documents show Larre was suspended by the college in 2006, pending an investigation into complaints concerning his competence in connection with the preparation of certain psychological assessments.

His registration was cancelled Jan. 1, 2008, after he chose not to renew it during the suspension and also agreed not to apply for reinstatement.

Larre could not immediately be reached for comment.

In 2008, Larre told The Canadian Press that he was convicted in Saskatchewan of assault and administering noxious substances relating to work he did with at-risk youth.

He said he later applied for and received pardons for both crimes from the National Parole Board.

Larre said the assault charge stemmed from 1974, when he slapped a 19-year-old woman who was abusing drugs and breaking the law.

He said the other charge arose after he and a nurse pressured three teens to ingest a handful of unidentified vitamins, sugar pills and placebos to teach them a lesson about taking drugs.

Larre’s website says he has his doctorate in clinical psychology, but that he no longer works as a psychologist.

It says he continues to help children and their families, conducting training workshops for parents and teachers and preaching parish missions across Canada and abroad.

Larre was named to the Order of Canada in 1983 for founding the Bosco Centres for troubled youth, but later renounced his membership to protest the same honour being bestowed upon abortion rights champion Dr. Henry Morgentaler.

He received the Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012 in recognition of his contributions to Canadian children, adolescents and families.

Amy Smart, The Canadian Press

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