The Keremeos Volunteer Fire Department has worked along side the BC Wildfire crews doing water suppression, putting out spot fires, and patrolling.

B.C. residents defy evacuation orders as wildfires burn

BC Wildfire Service said more than 550 fires were burning Friday in all areas of the province

Rise Johansen is among many British Columbians who have decided against obeying an evacuation order because of a wildfire, choosing instead to remain behind in Takysie to help others who are staying in their homes.

On Friday, she said the sun was out and the smoke had lifted slightly.

“It’s a very odd experience because sometimes you wouldn’t even hardly know there’s a fire,” said Johansen, the co-owner of Takysie Lake Resort.

She and her husband are two of the last people left in a tiny community of about 20 homes on Takysie Lake in central B.C. As fires snaked through the area this summer, many homes were evacuated — even the Johansens left before returning.

“We just went down the road a little bit and then we’ve come back,” Johansen said in a telephone interview on Friday. “We didn’t feel like we were in imminent danger the night they started to evacuate.”

She said the couple will stay as long as they feel safe. They run a store, resort, gas station and restaurant, and have had a steady stream of people coming to them for everything from a cup of coffee to gas for their vehicles.

The BC Wildfire Service said more than 550 fires were burning Friday in all areas of the province. Sixty were considered fires of note, meaning they either posed a threat to people and property or were highly visible. Most were in the province’s southeast.

Winds complicated the battle against many fires, including two with a combined area of more than 1,000 square kilometres southwest of Burns Lake and along the south shore of Francois Lake, where some people have defied an evacuation order to protect their land.

Rodney Holland, chief administrative officer at nearby Fraser Lake, said evacuation orders are based on personal safety, although adults have the option of defying the orders. He said he understands why people would, based on an underlying belief that nobody will protect their property as diligently as they would.

Johansen was also critical of the response to the fires by government agencies.

“The boots on the ground are all awesome. The guys and the gals are working their asses off,” she said. “But the system of how this is being taken care of is immensely flawed. And that’s why so many people have stayed here — and I hate to use the word defied, but defied the evacuation order — because we don’t have enough faith in the people making the decisions.”

Holland said it is “frustrating” that some people are not happy with the government’s handling of the fires.

“From everything that we’ve seen, everybody’s who’s responding to this fire is doing the very best possible,” he said. “We can’t control Mother Nature — Mother Nature is much bigger than us and the first responders and it’s sad that these people … are sitting back and criticizing. It’s just sad.”

Some members of the Nadleh Whut’en First Nation have also defied evacuation orders and have stayed behind to protect their homes.

Dana Glanville, who wrote a letter to the government following a public meeting in Grassy Plains, said she’s frustrated that authorities aren’t using valuable local knowledge to fight the fires and dismissed suggestions that local residents are naive or unprepared.

“These are seasoned people who are farm people and loggers and contractors and many of them have had extensive experience fighting fires of all sizes and types for many, many years,” she said Thursday. “They’re not wet behind the ears by any stroke of the imagination.”

Glanville said between 100 and 150 residents on the south side of Francois Lake stayed behind to protect the land.

“It’s home. It’s a beautiful little corner of the province,’ said Glanville, a former forestry technician. “It’s wild, it’s free. It’s filled with probably some of the last very, very self-reliant, hard-working, honest people.”

Ginger Moyah, a resident of the south side of the lake, on Saturday attempted to organize a last-minute blockade of millions of dollars of firefighting equipment when contractor Safeguard was redirected to another fire complex.

Moyah said she’s frustrated her community has lost three houses over the past several days, which she believes could have been saved.

Kelsey Winter of the BC Wildfire Service said the decision to divert the contractors to a different fire complex was made based on discussions with Safeguard, which said its fire suppression tool was ill-suited for the area around Francois Lake.

Winter said the tool in question requires deep water reserves in flat areas, and was designed to save buildings that are more densely packed together.

“Unfortunately in the areas of this fire where the tool would be effective, the water sources were insufficient, or the terrain was too challenging, and there was a significant distance between structures,” she said.

“Even though this is the Lake district, the water sources weren’t the correct fit for that particular system.”

— With files from Amy Smart and Spencer Harwood in Vancouver

Hina Alam, The Canadian Press

Just Posted

Suspected spill kills hundreds of crayfish, coho in Langley river

A fish kill in the Nicomekl has a biologist concerned for the health of the local ecosystem.

Rams harvest sweet victory in win over Huskers

The Chilliwack team found itself pushed back again and again.

WATCH: Cops for Cancer bring message of hope to Langley school

Young cancer survivors are traveling with the fundraising bike ride.

Langley venue of glass provides bright stage for charity art show

West Fine Arts Show runs Friday to Sunday at South Langley’s Glass House Estate Winery.

Driver of pickup stolen from Langley crashes into car in Abbotsford

No serious injuries in collision on Monday night

B.C. RCMP turn to Const. Scarecrow to shock speeders into slowing down

New addition will watch over drivers from a Coquitlam median for first-of-its-kind pilot in Canada

Aldergrove soccer forward enjoys scoring spree

UFV Cascades’ Jhaj named Canada West second star of the week

B.C. home to 1/3 of Canada’s overdose deaths in first 3 months of the year

There were 1,036 overdose deaths in the first three months of the year, with 94 per cent accidental

B.C. candidate moves from hospice care to council race

He beat terminal cancer twice and entered hospice when he decided to run for council.

Canadian tobacco exec pushes back against vaping health concerns

A warning from Interior Health about the unknown health risks of vaping is getting a partial rebuke

New ‘meowyoral’ race featuring felines announced by B.C. animal shelter

Organizers hope the cat election will generate attention for shelter and local municipal election

Ministry of Agriculture commits $300,000 to help B.C. farmers obtain land

B.C. Land Matching Program supports access to affordable farmland for young farmers

Lower Mainland city calls for slower trains near popular beach

Surrey Mayor Linda Hepner said ‘it’s the least we can do’

Most Read