2002 jail cell image of serial killer Robert Pickton

Children of serial killer Pickton’s victims get $50,000 each

Justice Minister Suzanne Anton says no compensation fully reflects 'loss of a mother'

Children of the victims of serial killer Robert Pickton will each be paid $50,000 as compensation for policing failures that allowed the Port Coquitlam pig farmer to prey on vulnerable women for years.

The $4.9-million deal between the provincial and federal governments and City of Vancouver provides the payments to 98 children of 67 missing or murdered women tied to Pickton and addresses a key recommendation of the Missing Women Inquiry led by Wally Oppal.

Justice Minister Suzanne Anton said the money offers a chance for victims’ families to improve their education, housing or other circumstances.

She acknowledged no amount can fully repay families for the loss of their loved ones.

“It’s a fair amount, it’s the right thing to do,” Anton said. “But we can’t compensate for the loss of a mother.”

The agreement is expected to settle a civil lawsuit brought by 13 families of victims.

Pickton was convicted in 2007 on six counts of second-degree murder and is serving a life sentence with no chance of parole for 25 years.

He was arrested in 2002, but Oppal found better policing should have caught him years earlier, preventing the disappearances of many addicted Downtown Eastside sex trade workers whose DNA was later found on the Pickton farm.

Oppal cited the “intergenerational impact” of Pickton’s crimes and the need to break the hold of violence on families in recommending the compensation fund for children.

Anton said the province has fulfilled or is making substantial progress on three-quarters of the inquiry’s recommendations.

“I will always regret that we did not catch this killer sooner,” Vancouver Police Chief Jim Chu said.

Both he and RCMP Dep. Comm. Craig Callens reiterated past apologies for the policing failures.

Callens said policing has improved on multiple fronts since the Pickton investigation.

He said another inquiry recommendation on improved police information sharing and analysis for serious crimes will be addressed when a new 24-hour real-time intelligence centre opens in May at the RCMP’s E Division headquarters in Surrey.

Just Posted

Spreading Christmas cheer around Aldergrove

Easing the pains and difficulties of hard times is ‘reason for the season’

120 turn up for Aldergrove blood clinic

More volunteer help welcomed by Canadian Blood Services

VIDEO: Hundreds compete in Langley Olympians intra club meet

An opportunity for older and younger swimmers to get a taste of competition, coach says

VIDEO: Basics for Babies underway at Langley Events Centre

Canadian country stars perform at fundraiser

Trudeau to make it harder for future PM to reverse Senate reforms

Of the 105 current senators, 54 are now independents who have banded together in Independent Senators’ Group

Boeser has 2 points as Canucks ground Flyers 5-1

WATCH: Vancouver has little trouble with slumping Philly side

Man dies after falling from B.C. bridge

Intoxicated man climbed railing, lost his balance and fell into the water below

Hundreds attend Hells Angels funeral in Maple Ridge

Body of Chad John Wilson found last month face-down under the Golden Ears Bridge.

B.C. animation team the ‘heart’ of new ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

The animators, largely based in Vancouver, ultimately came up with a creative technique that is drawing praise

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Gas prices to climb 11 cents overnight in Lower Mainland

Hike of 17 cents in less than 48 hours due to unexpected shutdown of Washington state pipeline

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

Most Read