City project aims to discourage beaver presence

Municipality is running a trial project to stop flooding without trapping beavers

Beavers have caused flood damage through their dam construction.

As beavers continue to pose a threat by damming up culverts and other waterways, the municipality is running a trial project off King Road to stop flooding without resorting to trapping the buck-toothed builders.

Beavers have been in the project area for a couple of years and have caused flooding by building their dams.

A couple of months ago the city of Abbotsford approved the installation of pond levelers, which are pipes that run through the beaver’s dam to drain the pond. The device is used to trick beavers into thinking there is a breach in the dam. When the beaver is unable to figure out how to keep the water in, the intent is that it will move on to a new area.

City staff say the efforts are working well and the pond is at a comfortable level, with no threat of flooding downstream. But staff say there is a beaver still attempting to fix the problem in the dam and is being monitored until it decides to vacate.

The project was started at the suggestion and assistance of the Association for the Protection of Fur-Bearing Animals (APFA).

The organization made a presentation on alternatives to trapping in Abbotsford last year after a coyote was discovered caught in a leg-hold trap in March. The animal was gruesomely injured and eventually put down. The act was condemned by APFA, as well as the BC Trappers Association, which said such cases are usually due to inexperienced or unlicensed trappers.

Though that incident was not due to a city trap, in the past, Abbotsford has hired provincially licensed trappers to remove beavers from flooded areas.

APFA offered to help Abbotsford implement measures to address the problem of beavers without trapping.

APFA volunteers check on the new water flow devices and freely consult with municipalities, farmers, and other groups on non-lethal, long-term methods of managing animal populations, including beavers, coyotes, and raccoons.

A city spokesperson said the pond leveler is initially inexpensive to set up – less than $1,000 – but costs could add up. If the beaver continues to add material to the dam as water levels drop, engineering may have to send crews more frequently to remove debris, but at this time the city is unable to quantify the cost difference between traditional methods of trapping and removing dams and the new method.

Just Posted

Langley rollover crash slows traffic on 200 Street in Willoughby

Crews called to Monday afternoon collision involving two cars

VIDEO: Langley BMX racers propel pumpkins down their track

Once the standard race day was over, riders let a series of gourds roll down their Brookswood track.

Fort Langley wakes up to a flower bombing

A team from a village floral shop wanted to do a beautification project.

Abbotsford mom stuck in Africa over adoption delay

Kim and Clark Moran have been waiting four weeks to bring son home

Township mayor Jack Froese talks short- and long-term goals for third term

Tree bylaw, pot sales among topics that will need attention in coming months

B.C. sailor surprised by humpback whale playing under her boat

Jodi Klahm-Kozicki said the experience was ‘magical’ near Denman Island

Ovechkin has 4 points as Caps rough up Canucks 5-2

WATCH: Defending champs pick up impressive win in Vancouver

Vancouver mayoral hopefuly admits defeat, congratulates winner Kennedy Stewart

Ken Sim of the Non-Partisan Association apologized for the time it took to acknowledge Stewart won

Mental fitness questioned of man charged in Chilliwack River Valley shooting

Peter Kampos told his lawyer ‘his dreams are being stolen and turned into drugs’ at Surrey Pre-trial

B.C. government moves to tighten resource industry regulations

New superintendent will oversee engineers, biologists, foresters

Election watchdog seeks digitally savvy specialists to zero in on threats

Move follows troublesome evidence of online Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election

More court before Dutch man charged in Amanda Todd case is extradited here

Appeals must be dealt with in Europe, before charges faced in B.C.

Most Read