Gladys and Ed Scherbey, pictured here in 2013 in their home, complained for years about the RCMP investigation into their son Corey’s 2011 death insisting he was murdered. A BC Coroner’s jury concluded on Nov. 5, 2020 that his death was accidental due to cocaine and alcohol toxicity. (Paul Henderson/ Black Press file)

Gladys and Ed Scherbey, pictured here in 2013 in their home, complained for years about the RCMP investigation into their son Corey’s 2011 death insisting he was murdered. A BC Coroner’s jury concluded on Nov. 5, 2020 that his death was accidental due to cocaine and alcohol toxicity. (Paul Henderson/ Black Press file)

Coroner’s inquest rules Fraser Valley man’s mysterious death ‘accidental’

Parents of Corey John Scherbey have claimed he was murdered for nine years

Corey John Scherbey’s 2011 death in Chilliwack has been ruled “accidental” due to cocaine and alcohol intoxication.

That conclusion after a BC Coroners Service inquest this week confirms the original report but will be a disappointment to Scherbey’s parents Ed and Gladys Scherbey who have been fighting for more than nine years to have his death declared a homicide.

“I think it’s murder and that’s it,” Ed told this reporter in 2013 in an interview at his home, surrounded by photos of the Corey while he was alive, but also gruesome photos of the scene in the 38-year-old’s house where his body was found on a Monday after a hot August weekend.

• READ MORE: Coroner’s inquest into mysterious death of Chilliwack man scheduled for Nov. 2

• READ MORE: OPINION: Homicide or overdose? The curious case of Corey Scherbey continues

The inquest started Monday (Nov. 2) with the jury decision rendered on Thursday (Nov. 5). Corey Scherbey’s mother Gladys Scherbey testified Monday at the Burnaby Coroners’ Court in a hearing that was broadcast using Microsoft Teams.

She first told the jury what kind of a person Corey was.

“He was loving, he was gentle, he was a super person,” she said. “I’m not saying this because he was just my son but he was my best friend as well.”

She was then asked about the details of her finding Corey’s body in his house on Aug. 22, 2011.

He wasn’t answering his phone or his doorbell, so Gladys went into his Strathcona Road house. There in his living room was a huge pool of dried blood on the floor, and Corey on his knees in front of the couch, face down.

“My heart sank,” she said on Monday. “I said ‘Corey, Corey, are you alright? Answer me, answer me Corey.’”

She said she went behind him, and her instinct was to put her arms around him to lift him up.

“All I could see was the back of his head. His hands were stretched out…. I pulled him against my chest and gently laid him down. When I laid him down, I looked … his face was dark. I saw no hair on the top of his head… his nose was white. I looked on both sides of his head. His right ear seemed to be missing, his left ear was completely flat.”

Gladys and Ed have been fighting for years against the RCMP’s conclusion that 38-year-old Corey died of a drug overdose.

A pathologist at the time determined the cause of death to be “acute combined cocaine and ethanol intoxication,” something the coroner confirmed Nov. 5.

The Scherbey’s insisted that Corey did not use drugs or even drink, and they pointed to a number of odd circumstances surrounding the crime scene, and events after his death.

There was the cardboard box found in his house with the words written on it: “Better be a funeral.”

Then there was a cryptic, typewritten note they received years after his death.

“Shakepeare [sic] said: ‘Hell hath no fury than a woman scorned,’” the note started. “That’s the kind of homicide is [sic] was, a scorned woman! Those who know who it was, belong to too tight a group to say a word!

“I think your son Corey decided too late to ‘back off’ and it jeopardized his well-being-his life!” The note was signed “a Reader of The CHWK Times.”

• READ MORE: Cryptic note may hold clue to Scherbey death

While the RCMP never admitted any wrongdoing, the Scherbeys accused it all along. Finally, in late 2018, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki agreed the investigation was not “reasonably thorough.”

That same year, one B.C. Supreme Court justice called for a review, and another suggested the Minister of Public Safety should consider an inquest.

The pandemic delayed the inquest from the spring until Nov. 2.

In the two-page verdict posted online on Nov. 5, the medical cause of death is reported as “acute combined ethanol and cocaine intoxication,” and the classification of death is ruled “accidental.”

The inquest jury’s single recommendations to RCMP headquarters (E-division) in B.C.: “Review policy or procedures to ensure the collection of all possible evidence in death investigations.”

• READ MORE: Chilliwack parents can’t accept police findings in death of son


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

@PeeJayAitch
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CoronavirusInquest

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Chris Veale, seen here at Brookswood Secondary School on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020, has been coaching girls basketball for more than 20 years (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
Coach Chris Veale backs his players

When the gym closed, this dedicated basketball coach found another way

Tabor Village took to social media on Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2020 to share what it meant to them to have Langley Lodge staff visit and provide support. As of Tuesday (Dec. 1), the outbreak at Tabor had resulted in a total of 147 cases and 19 deaths since Nov. 4. (Tabor Village/Facebook)
Langley Lodge shows ‘solidarity’ by visiting staff of B.C.’s largest COVID-19 care-home outbreak

As of Tuesday, Abbotsford facility recorded 147 cases and 19 deaths since Nov. 4

Brian Lott, of the Rotary Club of Langley Central, emceed the prize draw on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. (Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance Times)
Langley woman wins $73,615 in first ever Langley Rotary Mega Draw

After months of ticket sales, the draw was livestreamed from the Rotary Interpretive Centre Thursday

B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver. (Black Press Media files)
‘No smoke, no fire’ defense says in conflict case that could kick three off Langley Township council

Lawyers argued there’s no evidence of any conflict or vote-for-money deal

Kanata Soranaka became a Belmont bulldog this school year, and has used technology and innovation to continue to bring music to students despite the COVID-19 pandemic. (Heather Colpitts/Langley Advance Times)
Langley teacher finds new ways to keep the music playing during COVID

Kanata Soranaka and her music cart a common sight around Belmont Elementary

Motorists wait to enter a Fraser Health COVID-19 testing facility, in Surrey, B.C., on Monday, Nov. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Another 694 diagnosed with COVID-19 in B.C. Thursday

Three more health care outbreaks, 12 deaths

Cops converge in a Marshall Road parking lot on Thursday afternoon following a reported police incident. (Ben Lypka/Abbotsford News)
Federal offender escapes, gets shot at and is taken back into custody in Abbotsford

Several branches of law enforcement find escapee a short distance from where he fled

A demonstrator wears representations of sea lice outside the Fisheries and Oceans Canada offices in downtown Vancouver Sept. 24, demanding more action on the Cohen Commission recommendations to protect wild Fraser River sockeye. (Quinn Bender photo)
First Nations renew call to revoke salmon farm licences

Leadership council implores use of precautionary principle in Discovery Islands

Ten-month-old Aidan Deschamps poses for a photo with his parents Amanda Sully and Adam Deschamps in this undated handout photo. Ten-month-old Aidan Deschamps was the first baby in Canada to be diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy through Ontario’s newborn screening program. The test was added to the program six days before he was born. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, Children’s Hospital Eastern Ontario *MANDATORY CREDIT*
First newborn tested for spinal muscular atrophy in Canada hits new milestones

‘If Aidan had been born any earlier or anywhere else our story would be quite different’

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

(Pixabay)
Canadians’ mental health has deteriorated with the second wave, study finds

Increased substance use one of the ways people are coping

Surrey Pretrial centre in Newton. (Photo: Tom Zytaruk)
Surrey Pretrial hit with human rights complaint over mattress

The inmate who lodged the complaint said he needed a second mattress to help him manage his arthritis

A coal-fired power plant seen through dense smog from the window of an electric bullet train south of Beijing, December 2016. China has continued to increase thermal coal production and power generation, adding to greenhouse gas emissions that are already the world’s largest. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
LNG featured at B.C. energy industry, climate change conference

Hydrogen, nuclear, carbon capture needed for Canada’s net-zero goal

Most Read