COVID-19: BCCDC illustrates most common ‘exposure settings’

Table of transmission shows how the virus can spread through the community. (BCCDC image)Table of transmission shows how the virus can spread through the community. (BCCDC image)
Graph showing locations of where the COVID-19 virus is being transmitted. (BCCDC graph)Graph showing locations of where the COVID-19 virus is being transmitted. (BCCDC graph)
Graph showing locations of where the COVID-19 virus is being transmitted. (BCCDC graph)Graph showing locations of where the COVID-19 virus is being transmitted. (BCCDC graph)
Graph showing locations of where the COVID-19 virus is being transmitted. (BCCDC graph)Graph showing locations of where the COVID-19 virus is being transmitted. (BCCDC graph)

An update from the B.C. Centre for Disease Controls provides a clear picture of not only where COVID-19 is most prevalent, but in which settings it is being spread.

The update, published Nov. 12, shows Surrey has more cases than any other city in the province, with at least 3,993. Surrey is also home to more than 27 per cent of B.C.’s confirmed cases. Extending north to 40 Avenue, South Surrey-White Rock is in a different health boundary than the rest of Surrey, and reported 298 cases.

However, the numbers are expected to climb.

The BCCDC updates its city-by-city health region figures once per month. The number of cases in the Surrey health boundary, which is within Fraser Health, was last updated Oct. 31, when there were only 14,381 cases in the province. Since then, the province has added another 8,532 new cases, bringing the provincial total to 22,944.

Data from Sept. 13 to Oct. 28 shows the group most significantly affected by the virus continues to be people in their 20s, followed by people in their 30s, 40s, and 50s, respectively.

Of the known and reported locations where transmission is most prevalent, households rank at the top, followed by workplaces.

RELATED: Surrey’s home to more than 27% of B.C.’s COVID-19 cases

However, the exception is people older than 80, who are most likely to get infected through healthcare contacts.

In a news briefing Monday, Henry said a majority of cases are linked to indoor social gatherings, and times when people gather before and after “safe events” such as watching a game, or picking up children from school, or going to a restaurant.

“The number of cases and outbreaks is showing us, we are in the most challenging of times,” Henry said. “We have come through a wave, we’re now in the midst of our second.”

In the update, the BCCDC provided an illustration of how the virus can be spread through a chain of transmission in Fraser Health.

Working on actual case data, but withholding names of people, businesses and locations, the BCCDC explained that one infected guest at a 50-person wedding in August resulted in 15 guests testing positive for COVID-19. The virus then spread to a long-term care home, requiring 81 residents to self-isolate in their room. One person ended up dying from the virus.

At an industrial site, one employee who was positive for the disease transmitted the virus to 48 colleagues last month. A further seven people tested positive after interacting with one of the 48 employees, which put a car dealership, medical clinic, lumber mill and processing plant at risk.

Of the initial 48 people who were initially infected, 46 households were affected resulting in 111 additional people being required to self-isolate.

RELATED: What the new COVID-19 health orders mean for Surrey residents, businesses

In response to a question about the rate of virus transmission in the South Asian community, Henry said the province has seen “quite a lot” of transmission in that community, particularly in Fraser Health.

“But we know, that’s where a lot of people of South Asian descent live. We have a large and vibrant active community there,” Henry said, adding that many people in the South Asian community are essential workers. “What we are seeing is that there are many families affected in the South Asian community, and many people live in large multigenerational families. Like other, similar communities, when one person is infected it can spread very quickly to many others in that family.”

Earlier this month, the province introduced new, tighter restrictions for residents in Surrey and White Rock. The new public health order prohibits people from gathering with people outside of their immediate household, whether that’s at indoor or outdoor gatherings.



aaron.hinks@peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

CoronavirusSurreywhite rock

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Trent Miner is returning to the Vancouver Giants, the team announced. He has been released by the Colorado Eagles of the AHL.(Rik Fedyck/Vancouver Giants)
Trent Miner returns to play goal for Vancouver Giants

Netminder was part of epic 11-game winning-streak by Langley-based team

Vehicles lined up at the testing clinic at KPU’s Langley parking lot on Wednesday, Feb. 17. The site is also giving vaccinations to seniors 90 and over starting next week. (Langley Advance Times files)
KPU testing site will also host Langley mass vaccination clinic

Drive-through vaccinations will be available for those 90 and over next week

Langley native Tamara Lovelace has been named to the Team USA medical team for the Beijing Winter Olympics in 2022 (Special to Langley Advance Times)
How a ‘very focused’ Brookswood Secondary grad ended up a Team USA doctor

Langley’s Tamara Lovelace was going to be a ballerina

SkyTrain running through Whalley. (File photo: Tom Zytaruk)
Mayors’ Council wants feds to fund Surrey-Langley SkyTrain in upcoming budget

Mayors’ Council on regional transportation sent letter to federal government Monday

(The Canadian Press)
‘Worse than Sept. 11, SARS and financial crisis combined’: Tourism industry in crisis

Travel services saw the biggest drop in active businesses with 31 per cent fewer firms operating

Some of the hundreds of pounds of trash removed by divers last month from Abbotsford’s Walmsley Lake.(Henry Wang photo)
VIDEO: Divers remove 462 pounds of trash from Abbotsford lake

Walmsley Lake dive uncovers several tires, hundreds of drink containers and a tent

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix provide a regular update on the COVID-19 situation, B.C. legislature, March 2, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 cases: 545 Saturday, 532 Sunday, 385 Monday

Focus on Prince Rupert, Lower Mainland large workplaces

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Rising accident rates and payout costs have contributed to billion-dollar deficits at ICBC. (Comox Valley Record)
B.C. appealing decision keeping ICBC injury cases in court

David Eby vows to ‘clip wings’ of personal injury lawyers

(Black Press Media files)
Hosts charged, attendees facing COVID fines after Vancouver police bust party at condo

Police had previously received 10 complains about that condo

Minister of Families, Children and Social Development Ahmed Hussen takes part in an update on the COVID pandemic during a press conference in Ottawa on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2020. A joint federal and B.C. government housing program announced today aims to help people living in up to 25,000 vulnerable households pay their rent. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Federal, B.C. governments announce $517-million rent aid program to help vulnerable

Benefits for those not eligible for B.C.’s Rental Assistance Program or Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters

(BC SPCA)
Is it safe to give your dog some peanut butter? Not always, BC SPCA warns

Some commercial peanut butter ingredients can be harmful to dogs

Most Read