Canopy Growth grew cannabis in a large greenhouse complex in Aldergrove after legalization, but before it shut down the operation’s odours irked neighbours. (Black Press Media files)

Canopy Growth grew cannabis in a large greenhouse complex in Aldergrove after legalization, but before it shut down the operation’s odours irked neighbours. (Black Press Media files)

Deadline approaches to give input on cannabis, wood burning to Metro Vancouver

Langley residents can comment on both issues up to Feb. 1

Langley residents in agricultural areas have a less than two weeks to comment on new regulations on a pair of issues – agricultural burning, and odours from cannabis farms.

Feedback on both issues is being collected by Metro Vancouver, which regulates air quality, until Feb. 1.

On cannabis production, the new proposed rules are expected to be more streamlines, and to protect the environment and public health.

Metro Vancouver’s core principles for planned new rules are about prevention and control of emissions, following a “discharger pays” principle, and addressing the public’s concerns. However, the regional district has noted that odours may not be entirely eliminated.

The proposed rules include requirements for emissions to be captured and treated with activated carbon filters, with complaints response plans and a 200 metre minimum distance for new facilities from residential properties, hospitals, schools, day cares, playgrounds, and care homes.

Fights over farm odours and noises have cropped up in Langley from time to time, including over cannabis.

When Canopy Growth took over a large existing greenhouse operation in South Aldergrove, residents nearby almost immediately complained about the smell coming from the complex.

Similarly, agricultural burning regulations are expected to be simpler and more efficient.

In Metro Vancouver’s farming regions, including Langley, “vegetative debris” can be burned. That can be stubble, dried grass, dead shrubs, branches, and leaves. The waste comes from agriculture, land clearing, residential land maintenance, and sometimes from forestry.

Although communities like Langley Township can impose burning regulations on homeowners, burning for agricultural purposes falls outside of those rules.

More information on both the cannabis and debris burning regulations have already been held and can be seen online by visiting metrovancouver.org. To discuss the proposals with Metro Vancouver staff, email AQBylaw@metrovanouver.org.

READ ALSO: Metro Vancouver seeks input on rules to reduce cannabis grow odours


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