Highway 1 collision numbers stable along Abbotsford portion

Between 2010 and 2013, there were seven people each year who suffered serious injuries due to collisions on the highway

There has been no increase in serious crashes along Highway 1 in Abbotsford over previous years.

The Abbotsford stretch of Highway 1 sees its share of serious collisions – such as a five-car pileup on Feb. 14 – but, according to the RCMP, crash figures have remained stable over the last five years.

Between 2010 and 2013, there were seven people each year who suffered serious injuries due to collisions on the highway – involving at least one night in hospital. The Abbotsford stretch runs from about 275 Street in the west to Boundary Road in the east.

Cpl. Robert McDonald, with the RCMP Traffic Service, said that in 2008, there were five such cases; in 2009, a high of nine.

“We’re not seeing an increase in collisions – nothing that would concern us enough to create a special project.”

The numbers of people with less serious injuries, such as soft tissue damage and broken arms, were also fairly stable, falling within a range of 46 to 64 per year over the last six years. Specifically, there were 59 people with injuries in 2013, 63 in 2012, 46 in 2011, 58 in 2010, 64 in 2009, and 52 in 2008. McDonald noted that the 2013 figures aren’t yet final.

There were no fatalities on the Abbotsford stretch of the Trans-Canada Highway in that time.

The ICBC’s online crash map does show a high number of crashes in Abbotsford along the highway. Around the Sumas Way exit, collisions reached 132 in 2012, a three-year high. At the Mt. Lehman exit, the second most dangerous zone along the highway, there were 111 crashes in 2012, a four-year high.

However, McDonald cautioned that these figures present an inflated picture of the situation because they include minor rear-enders and scratches that result in no injuries. They also include occurrences off the highway, such as at the on- and off-ramps. Many are “more than likely” related to construction on the highway, said McDonald, where cars are bumper to bumper and are more likely to collide. Most incidents were not significant enough to warrant police attendance.

Just Posted

Orangeville Northmen take Minto Cup at Langley Events Centre

Swept best-of-five series 3-0 over Victoria Shamrocks

Langley RCMP’s hunt for wanted thief ends in tasing at Aldergrove store

Prolific Offender Supression Team officers arrested the man, who had been evading police for weeks

On the cutting edge of business

Ace Hardware opens its doors in Walnut Grove

Memorial to Carson Crimeni to stay in place through to September

Hundreds of tributes have been left at the Walnut Grove skate park

Langley Township urged to take feral rabbit-control measures

An Aldergrove farm being overrun with domestic rabbits as well as local shelter

RCMP respond to incident at Surrey Memorial Hospital

Police were also on scene at a nearby apartment complex

Groups ready campaign to help young voters identify ‘fake news’ in election

The media literacy campaign to focus on identifying misinformation and suspicious sources online

Big rally in northern B.C. draws attention to continuing lumber crisis

Mayor Joan Atkinson says about 400 workers have been directly affected by the closure of the Canfor mill

Expanded support to help B.C. youth from care attend university still falling short

Inadequate support, limited awareness and eligibility restrictions some of the existing challenges

Ethnic media aim to help maintain boost in voting by new Canadians

Statistics Canada says new Canadians made up about one-fifth of the voting population in 2016

UPDATE: Crown cross-examines B.C. father accused of killing daughters

Andrew Berry is charged in the deaths of six-year-old Chloe and four-year-old Aubrey in 2017

Dog attacked by river otters, Penticton owner says

Marie Fletcher says her dog was pulled underwater by four river otters in the Penticton Channel

BC SPCA overwhelmed with cats, kittens needing homes

Large number of cruelty investigations, plus normal ‘kitten season’ to blame

Most Read