KPU music students at rally against funding cuts to the Langley-based program. File photo

Kwantlen music students looking elsewhere because of budget tightening, student leader says

Transfer to other schools being sought in response to freeze on new admissions to music program

Current Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) music students have begun applying to other music schools as a result of budget tightening that canceled all new admissions to the Langley-based program.

That’s according to the head of the Kwantlen Music Students Association, Emma Dotto, who said the applications to transfer out are a response to the KPU board of governors approval in March of a 2018-19 budget that froze admissions, despite an outcry from students and instructors.

“It feels very depressing,” Dotto said.

She expects the number of students will drop from the current 80 to around 50 or 60, the combined result of the freeze on new admissions, graduations and students transferring to other music schools.

As a third-year student who is close to graduating, Dotto said she intends to stay on because a transfer would involve adjusting to a different school late in her studies.

Students in their first and second years are more likely to make a change, she said.

When the admissions freeze was first announced, music students staged several protests with the support of their instructors, including a weekend outdoor concert in Langley City, in a bid to have university administrators change their mind before the budget vote.

“We did the best we could,” Dotto said.

“No one’s happy.”

READ MORE: Music students at Kwantlen Polytechnic University battle cuts

KPU President and Vice Chancellor Dr. Alan Davis said the budget represents the first year of a five-year plan to bring “long-term financial sustainability” to the university.

Davis said a careful review by KPU showed university revenues were going to “plateau” while expenses continued to rise.

“The approval of this balanced budget was critically important for KPU’s long-term success because it represents an integrated approach to ensuring the university is financially sustainable while continuing to serve its students and its communities,” Davis said.

In a email to KPU instructors, Diane Walsh, Kwantlen Faculty Association Executive Vice-President said a review of the budget by an “external data analyst” shows it “is built on cuts to faculty and programs, cuts being made without adequate consultation with faculty.”

Walsh said there has been a 38 per cent increase in administrative salaries over the last two fiscal years.

“Surely if there is a financial crisis, there should be a net cut in administrative salary, but there is not,” Walsh said.

“The only employee group at KPU seeing a reduction is faculty,” Walsh added.

“And over the coming years, faculty will be cut more.”

.

_________________________________

Is there more to this story?

Email: dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter

_________________________________

Just Posted

Back to school surprise in store for Aldergrove’s Kinsmen complex

Coalition of community groups seek school supplies for kids in need

tbird drives boost in Langley agri-tourism

Visitors encouraged to take in what Langley has to offer en route to world cup in Langley

Runners pair up for the Gruesome Twosome course in Aldergrove

‘Run Like A Girl’ founders design 5K, 11K, and half-marathon for pairs of all ages

And the lucky Langley winner is…

Willoughby’s Nancy Frustaci has 16 minutes to spent $1,000 in the Advance Times annual shopping spree

Pickle me this: All the outrageous foods at this year’s PNE

Pickled cotton candy, deep-fried chicken skins, and ramen corndogs are just a start

New study suggests autism overdiagnosed: Canadian expert

Laurent Mottron: ‘Autistic people we test now are less and less different than typical people’

B.C. father tells judge he did not kill his young daughters

Andrew Berry pleaded not guilty to the December 2017 deaths

Trans Mountain gives contractors 30 days to get workers, supplies ready for pipeline

Crown corporation believes the expansion project could be in service by mid-2022

Mammoth sturgeon catch was ‘a fish of a lifetime’ for Chilliwack guide

Sturgeon was so enormous it tied for largest specimen every tagged and released in the Fraser

Fraser River sea bus proposed to hook into TransLink system

Maple Ridge councillor just wants to start discussion

Rosemount cooked diced chicken linked to listeria case in B.C.

The symptoms of listeria include vomiting, nausea, fever, muscle aches

Body found believed to be missing Chilliwack senior with dementia

Police say case is now in the hands of the coroner

Most Read