Architectural renderings show the proposed housing development on 66th Avenue in Langley Township. (Compass Cohousing/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Architectural renderings show the proposed housing development on 66th Avenue in Langley Township. (Compass Cohousing/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Langley cohousing plans closer to reality

The 40-unit project would be the second cohousing development in Langley

Langley’s next planned cohousing development is getting closer to reality, as it moves towards applications for rezoning and development.

The project, planned for the corner of 66th Avenue and 203rd Street, on a piece of Township-owned land, was originally planned to have between 34 and 37 units.

But with architectural plans largely done, that has increased to 40 units, said Elizabeth Rosenau.

“We feel that this will be a standout project,” said Rosenau, a member of one of the seven families or individuals who have already invested in the project.

Cohousing is a form of housing in which the owners work together to actively plan the project, and once it’s built, manage it together. It’s generally more cooperative and means more direct involvement by the owners than a strata council.

READ MORE: Cohousing project seeks new members for Langley development

The project’s owner-creators have hired their builder, an architect, and last week unveiled renderings of the project as it is expected to appear when built.

It will be different from most developer-built complexes, with a much wider variety of styles of units – more than a dozen different styles – and sizes ranging from studios to four bedrooms.

The project will be built around a central courtyard with no car access, creating a play and gathering space for families and kids.

And there will be an alternative to car ownership.

“We’re definitely going to do a car share club,” said Rosenau.

That will mean two electric vehicles owned by the cohousing complex to start with.

Despite the progress, it has not been an easy year for the project.

“All cohousing projects throughout Noth America have been badly hit by the uncertainty that surrounds COVID,” said Rosenau.

Some things have become easier, however.

Because everyone was forced to learn how to use Zoom, the cohousing crew has been able to hold quick, flexible meetings.

They’ve also switched promotion of the project from in-person open house type meetings to online, which has allowed them to connect with prospective members from Yukon and Newfoundland – people who used to live in the Lower Mainland or have family here, said Rosenau.

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