(File photo)

Overnight Pattullo Bridge lane closures begin Sunday

The crossing will be closed to one direction of traffic each night, from Sept. 16 to 20

As part of TransLink’s annual Pattullo Bridge safety inspections, two lanes of the crossing will close each night from Sunday Sept. 16 through to Sept. 20.

A replacement of the 80-year-old bridge is expected to be complete in 2023 but until then TransLink plans these yearly inspections “to ensure it remains safe.”

See also: Pattullo Bridge turns 80 years old today Nov. 15, 2017

See also: VIDEO: New Pattullo Bridge expected to open in 2023

During the upcoming closures, nightly traffic access will be open in only one direction.

The lane closures will occur between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.. Northbound lanes (Surrey heading to New Westminster) will close on Sept. 16 and 17, and southbound lanes (New Westminster heading to Surrey) will close on Sept. 18, 19 and 20.

According to a media advisory, the inspection includes a snooper truck on the bridge deck extending its “basket” outwards and curling under the deck surface where crews can inspect the underside of the bridge. The lane closures are required for the safety of the inspection crew and for people driving across the bridge.

Drivers are encouraged to use the Port Mann or Alex Fraser bridges as alternatives during the inspection.

See more: Surrey Mayor cuts head open during tour of Pattullo Bridge

“Transit customers taking the N19 NightBus should plan for an additional 30 minutes of travel time due to re-routing of the bus over the Alex Fraser and Queensborough Bridges,” the transit authority noted in a release. “Road signs will display closure details until all work is complete. On the nights of the inspection, drivers are asked to obey all traffic-control devices and personnel on the bridge approaches, and to allow for extra travel time due to detours.”

TransLink notes emergency vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians will be able to cross the bridge at all times.

For information, visit translink.ca/pattullo.



amy.reid@surreynowleader.com

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