Pulitzers honour coverage of 3 US mass shootings in 2018

Pulitzers honour coverage of 3 US mass shootings in 2018

The Associated Press won in the international reporting category for documenting the humanitarian horrors of Yemen’s civil war

The South Florida Sun Sentinel and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette won Pulitzer Prizes on Monday and were recognized along with the Capital Gazette of Maryland for their coverage of three horrifying mass shootings in 2018 at a high school, a synagogue and a newsroom itself.

The Associated Press won in the international reporting category for documenting the humanitarian horrors of Yemen’s civil war, while The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal were honoured for delving into President Donald Trump’s finances and breaking open the hush-money scandals involving two women who said they had affairs with him.

The Florida paper received the Pulitzer in public service for its coverage of the massacre of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland and for detailing the shortcomings in school discipline and security that contributed to the carnage.The Post-Gazette received the prize in the breaking news category for its reporting on the synagogue rampage that left 11 people dead. The man awaiting trial in the attack railed against Jews before, during and after the massacre, authorities said.

READ MORE: 26 victims of Parkland shooting sue school board, sheriff

After the Pulitzer announcement, the newsroom in Pittsburgh observed a moment of silence for the victims. At the Sun Sentinel, too, the staff took in the award in a sober spirit.

“We’re mindful of what it is that we won for,” Editor-in-Chief Julie Anderson said. “There are still families grieving, so it’s not joy, it’s almost … I don’t know how to describe it. We’re emotional, as well.”

So, too, at the Capital Gazette, which was given a special citation for its coverage and courage in the face of a massacre in its own newsroom. The Pulitzer board also gave the paper an extraordinary $100,000 grant to further its journalism.

“Clearly, there were a lot of mixed feelings,” said Rick Hutzell, editor of Capital Gazette Communications. “No one wants to win an award for something that kills five of your friends.”

The Annapolis-based newspaper published on schedule, with some help from The Baltimore Sun, the day after five staffers were shot and killed in one of the deadliest attacks on journalists in U.S. history. The man charged had a longstanding grudge against the paper.

READ MORE: 5 dead, others wounded at Maryland newspaper shooting

The Pulitzers, U.S. journalism’s highest honour, reflected a year when journalism also came under attack in other ways.

Reuters won an international reporting award for work that cost two of its staffers their liberty: coverage of a brutal crackdown on Rohingya Muslims by security forces in Myanmar.

Reporters Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo are serving a seven-year sentence after being convicted of violating the country’s Official Secrets Act. Their supporters say the two were framed in retaliation for their reporting.

Reuters also won the breaking news photography award for images of Central and South American migrants heading to the U.S.

The AP’s international reporting prize went to a team of journalists who documented atrocities and suffering in Yemen, illuminating the human toll of its 4-year-old civil war.

As a result of the work by reporter Maggie Michael, photographer Nariman El-Mofty and video journalist Maad al-Zikry, at least 80 prisoners were released from secret detention sites, and the United Nations rushed food and medicine to areas where the AP revealed that people were starving while corrupt officials diverted international food aid.

“This is a story that everybody was not really paying good attention, and we’re very happy to be able to draw some attention to it,” Michael said.

Images of the famine in Yemen also brought a feature photography award for The Washington Post. The Post’s book critic, Carlos Lozada, won the criticism prize for what the judges called “trenchant and searching” work.

In the U.S., journalists have been contending with attacks on the media’s integrity from the president on down. Trump has branded coverage of his administration “fake news” and assailed the media as the “enemy of the people.”

Monday’s wins by the Times and The Wall Street Journal and freelance cartoonist Darrin Bell may further anger the president.

The Times won the explanatory reporting Pulitzer for laying out how a president who has portrayed himself as a largely self-made man has, in fact, received over $400 million in family money and helped his family avoid hundreds of millions of dollars in taxes. Trump has called the Times expose a false “hit piece.”

The Journal took the national reporting award for its investigations of payments orchestrated by the president’s former lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, to silence porn star Stormy Daniels and a Playboy centerfold who claimed to have had affairs with Trump. Trump has denied having affairs with either woman.

Bell, the editorial cartooning winner, called out “lies, hypocrisy and fraud in the political turmoil surrounding the Trump administration,” the Pulitzer judges said.

The Los Angeles Times took the investigative reporting prize for stories that revealed hundreds of sexual abuse accusations against a recently retired University of Southern California gynecologist, who has denied the allegations. The university recently agreed to a $215 million settlement with the alleged victims.

The local reporting prize went to The Advocate of Louisiana for work that led to a state constitutional amendment abolishing the state’s unusual practice of allowing non-unanimous jury verdicts in felony trials.

ProPublica won the feature reporting award for cover of Salvadoran immigrants affected by a federal crackdown on the MS-13 gang.

Tony Messenger of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch won the commentary award for his series of columns about poor people being thrown back in jail in Missouri because they couldn’t afford to pay the costs of a previous stint behind bars.

READ MORE: Lawyer tight-lipped on alleged Stormy-Trump affair

The New York Times’ Brent Staples received the editorial writing award. The judges said his writing about the nation’s racial history showed “extraordinary moral clarity.”

The journalism prizes, first awarded in 1917, were established by newspaper publisher Joseph Pulitzer. Winners of the public service award receive a gold medal. The other awards carry a prize of $15,000 each.

___

Jennifer Peltz And Stephen R. Groves, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Aldergrove journalist Dean Broughton and his father, Bert. (Special to The Star)
Leave it to Aldergrove resident to tell your living legacy

Journalist Dean Broughton found the importance of family stories by conversing with his father

Langley’s Brie King, seen here playing as a TWU Spartan, was a standout for Canada Saturday, June 12, as the team downed Serbia 3-1. (file)
John Diefenbaker and Dwight Eisenhower at the signing of the Columbia River Treaty, January 1961. (White House Photo Office)
Painful Truth: All elections are a roll of the dice

A federal election is coming, and anything could happen

A worker clears out damaged fixtures from a front office of Coast Capital Savings credit union in Brookswood 4145 - 200th Street on Saturday, June 12, after a car knocked out an exterior roof support beam and smashed in a window. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
Car takes out front window of credit union in Brookswood

Witnesses say it happened while the driver was trying to park

Susan Cairns (left) during one of the school foundation’s annual fundraisers. Now, on behalf of the organization, she’s released a statement of support in the wake of the 215 children’s bodies discovered at a former residential school in Kamloops. (Langley Advance Times files)
Langley School District Foundation called to action by ‘atrocity’

Board and executive director describe ordeal as a ‘travesty’, and vow to ‘be there’ with support and aid

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement June 1. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

Most Read