A video shared by the Delta Police Department shows a car on Highway 17 weaving in and out of traffic at a high rate of speed, narrowly missing a police officer stopped on the side of the road. (Delta Police Department photo)

VIDEO: B.C. police officer nearly struck by speeding car

Footage shows a car in Delta weaving in and out of highway traffic and passing in a right turn lane

Delta police have released a video showing a speeding vehicle narrowly missing an officer conducting a traffic stop.

The video, shot on Monday, Sept. 30, shows a car weaving in and out of traffic at a high rate of speed. The vehicle moves into a right turn lane to bypass traffic, nearly clipping a Delta police officer and the vehicle he had pulled over.

Another driver, concerned by what he had witnessed, happened to catch the incident on his dash cam and turned the video over to the Delta Police Department.

According a press release accompanying the footage, the officer never got a look at the driver but felt the wind at his back as the driver narrowly avoided colliding with both his vehicle and him. The officer’s unmarked car had its red and blue flashing lights activated during the stop, though the low quality of the video deosn’t capture the lights well.

“Our officers were able to isolate the licence plate of the car in question from the video, and the officer who was nearly struck decided to pay a visit in person with the registered owner of the vehicle,” Acting-Inspector Ryan Hall, who oversees DPD’s traffic unit, said in press release.

The registered owner, who lives in Delta, received a $368 ticket for driving without due care and attention, however because the driver is unidentified, the ticket does not comes with its typical six points.

“This type of driving behaviour is so reckless,” Hall said. “This is exactly how fatal collisions happen. Less than a second of difference and we could have had a significantly different outcome. It was a beautiful sunny afternoon. It takes just one person, with selfish or unthinking driving behaviour, to cause unbelievable carnage and pain. We would also ask people to slow down and move to the opposite lane as dictated in the Motor Vehicle Act for their and the officers’ safety.”

Motorists in B.C. are required to slow down and move over for all vehicles stopped alongside the road that have flashing red, blue or yellow lights. This includes first responders, maintenance workers, tow trucks, Commercial Vehicle Safety Enforcement personnel, land surveyors, animal control workers, garbage collectors and other roadside workers.

To learn more about the Slow Down, Move Over law, head to www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/transportation/driving-and-cycling/road-safety-rules-and-consequences/slow-down-move-over.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

D.W. Poppy students rally against middle school

Inspired by one student, large crowds wore red during school district’s third consultation

Liberal MP slams Conservative opponent over assisted dying views in Cloverdale-Langley City

John Aldag said Tamara Jansen had trivialized the Holocaust with her remarks

Seniors a topic of Aldergrove’s election debate

Veterans, drug costs iscussed at latest all-candidates forum

$100,000 reward for B.C. gangster extended to United States

Police belive fugitive Conor D’Monte may be in the Los Angeles area

LETTER: Langley letter writers asks when can society stop saying sorry

A local man questions why City council feels the need to follow higher levels of government

VIDEO: Families flock to fire prevention event in Langley City

City firefighters focus on educating the public at their annual open house

Potent power play paces Canucks to 5-1 win over Detroit

Miller nets a pair as Vancouver wins third straight

After losing two baby boys, B.C. parents hope to cut through the taboo of infant death

Oct. 15 is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day in B.C.

Cheating husband sues mistress for gifted ring after wife learns about affair

The husband gave his mistress $1,000 to buy herself a ring in December 2017

B.C. massage therapist reprimanded, fined for exposing patients’ breasts

Registered massage therapist admits professional misconduct

B.C. boosts legal aid funding in new payment contract

‘Duty counsel’ service restored in some communities, David Eby says

Rugby Canada helps recovery efforts in Japan after typhoon cancels final match

Canadian players wanted to “give back in whatever small way they could”

Emily Carr University closed Sunday after fire causes some damage

The school is working with Vancouver police to assist their investigation into the fire

Alberta to join B.C.’s class-action lawsuit against opioid manufacturers, distributors

B.C. government claims opioids were falsely marketed as less addictive than other pain meds

Most Read