Election signs go up along the Willowbrook Connector in the Township of Langley. Miranda Gathercole Langley Times

Why election signs go up earlier in the Township of Langley

Township candidates have already started, Langley City counterparts have to wait

Campaign signs started appearing in the Township of Langley right after nominations for the Oct. 20 municipal elections opened on Sept. 4.

But they have yet to show up on Langley City streets, the result of regulations that forbid candidates from posting signs until after those same nominations close.

The result is Township candidates get an extra 10 days of roadside promotion, starting from the day nominations opened, while their City counterparts will have to wait until 4 p.m. on Sept. 14, when the nominations close.

It wasn’t supposed to be like that.

Township council actually approved a bylaw change that would have limited the time allowed for campaign signs to 20 days before the election.

But they did it during the July 9 evening meeting of council, after normal business hours, just missing a provincial deadline for passing election bylaws before the Oct. 20 municipal vote.

The minutes and video of the meeting show that Coun. Kim Richter, with the backing of Coun. Bob Long, wanted outdoor campaign signs banned until nominations closed, similar to Langley City.

The proposed motion noted that allowing placement to begin Sept. 4 would mean seven weeks of campaign signs — longer than usual for Langley Township.

“I think people are going to get fed up with signs,” Richter said.

Instead, council decided to restore a previous bylaw time limit for campaign signs that kept them from going up until 20 days before the election day, a period of just under three weeks.

But because council missed the deadline, the new restrictions won’t apply.

READ MORE: Big money and local elections

As it stands, the Township of Langley election signs bylaw sets out several restrictions on sign placement during an election, such as forbidding their placement “in such a way as to create a potential hazard to vehicular, pedestrian or cyclist traffic, and must not obstruct the view of any portion of a traffic control device, signal or intersection.”

Signs must be kept a minimum of 20 metres from any intersection.

Bylaw No. 5304 allows the Township of Langley to immediately remove signs that violate the bylaw.

For election or political signs on private property, residents are asked to contact legislative services at 604-533-6100 or email legservicesinfo@tol.ca.

For signs on streets or public property, contact bylaw enforcement at 604-532-7551 or engineering at 604-533-6006 or email enginfo@tol.ca.

Langley City restrictions include a requirement that signs “do not obstruct or otherwise interfere with sight lines or movement of motor vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists or any other, or obstruct the visibility of regulatory sign or other traffic control devices.”

More information about election rules in Langley City are available online at city.langley.bc.ca under “2018-local-government-election.”

Defacing, damaging or pulling down election or political signs anywhere is a criminal offence under the Criminal Code of Canada.

READ MORE: Times municipal election coverage

Other communities near the Langleys have different start dates for campaign signage.

Abbotsford allows campaign signs as soon as nominations open, while White Rock and Surrey forbid the posting of signs until nominations have closed.



dan.ferguson@langleytimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Second park ban won’t solve homeless crisis in Langley City, councillor predicts

‘They don’t have anywhere else to go,’ says Coun. Rosemary Wallace

Big Chill a hot event in Langley

Flight Museum holds “ask the pilot panel” and demos flights for young pilots over the weekend

Actors all aboard!

Creative Compass and Langley Historical Society hold auditions for CN Station vignettes

Do or die for Langley Tier 1 Thunder

Game will decide which team advances to the semifinals, and which team is done for the summer

VIDEO: B.C. MLA Michelle Stilwell takes first steps in nearly 30 years

‘It actually felt like walking. It’s been 27 years… but it felt realistic to me’

Report of dead body in B.C. park actually headless sex doll

This discovery, made at Manning Park on July 10, led police to uncovering two other sex mannequins

Grand Forks fire chief found to have bullied, harassed volunteer firefighter: report

WorkSafeBC, third-party human resources investigation looking into allegations complete

Dog recovering after being drenched in hot coffee, B.C. man charged

Man was taken into custody, charged, and released pending a court date

Taekwondo instructor, 21, identified as B.C. bat rabies victim

Nick Major, 21, an instructor at Cascadia Martial Arts in Parksville

Science expedition to Canada’s largest underwater volcano departs Vancouver Island

Crews prepared for a two-week research mission to the Explorer Seamount

B.C. shipyard to get one-third of $1.5 billion frigate-repair contract

The federal government has promised to invest $7.5 billion to maintain the 12 frigates

Worried about bats? Here’s what to do if you come across one in B.C.

Bat expert with the BC Community Bat Program urges caution around the small creatures

B.C. on right road with tougher ride-hailing driver rules, says expert

The provincial government is holding firm that ride-hailing drivers have a Class 4 licence

Most Read