Election signs go up along the Willowbrook Connector in the Township of Langley. Miranda Gathercole Langley Times

Why election signs go up earlier in the Township of Langley

Township candidates have already started, Langley City counterparts have to wait

Campaign signs started appearing in the Township of Langley right after nominations for the Oct. 20 municipal elections opened on Sept. 4.

But they have yet to show up on Langley City streets, the result of regulations that forbid candidates from posting signs until after those same nominations close.

The result is Township candidates get an extra 10 days of roadside promotion, starting from the day nominations opened, while their City counterparts will have to wait until 4 p.m. on Sept. 14, when the nominations close.

It wasn’t supposed to be like that.

Township council actually approved a bylaw change that would have limited the time allowed for campaign signs to 20 days before the election.

But they did it during the July 9 evening meeting of council, after normal business hours, just missing a provincial deadline for passing election bylaws before the Oct. 20 municipal vote.

The minutes and video of the meeting show that Coun. Kim Richter, with the backing of Coun. Bob Long, wanted outdoor campaign signs banned until nominations closed, similar to Langley City.

The proposed motion noted that allowing placement to begin Sept. 4 would mean seven weeks of campaign signs — longer than usual for Langley Township.

“I think people are going to get fed up with signs,” Richter said.

Instead, council decided to restore a previous bylaw time limit for campaign signs that kept them from going up until 20 days before the election day, a period of just under three weeks.

But because council missed the deadline, the new restrictions won’t apply.

READ MORE: Big money and local elections

As it stands, the Township of Langley election signs bylaw sets out several restrictions on sign placement during an election, such as forbidding their placement “in such a way as to create a potential hazard to vehicular, pedestrian or cyclist traffic, and must not obstruct the view of any portion of a traffic control device, signal or intersection.”

Signs must be kept a minimum of 20 metres from any intersection.

Bylaw No. 5304 allows the Township of Langley to immediately remove signs that violate the bylaw.

For election or political signs on private property, residents are asked to contact legislative services at 604-533-6100 or email legservicesinfo@tol.ca.

For signs on streets or public property, contact bylaw enforcement at 604-532-7551 or engineering at 604-533-6006 or email enginfo@tol.ca.

Langley City restrictions include a requirement that signs “do not obstruct or otherwise interfere with sight lines or movement of motor vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists or any other, or obstruct the visibility of regulatory sign or other traffic control devices.”

More information about election rules in Langley City are available online at city.langley.bc.ca under “2018-local-government-election.”

Defacing, damaging or pulling down election or political signs anywhere is a criminal offence under the Criminal Code of Canada.

READ MORE: Times municipal election coverage

Other communities near the Langleys have different start dates for campaign signage.

Abbotsford allows campaign signs as soon as nominations open, while White Rock and Surrey forbid the posting of signs until nominations have closed.



dan.ferguson@langleytimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Extradition hearing set for Langley developer accused of fraud

Mark Chandler will go before the B.C. Court of Appeals early next year.

Aldergrove remembers generous spirit of John Jones

Aldergrove Athletic Park soccer field to be named after community leader

Langley hosts woman whose story inspired Orange Shirt Day

A Williams Lake woman has been in schools this week and gives a public presentation Saturday.

Risk of thunderstorm this afternoon for Vancouver Island and Lower Mainland

A special weather statement calls for heavy rain and wind over the next 48 hours

Field renamed to honour champion of Langley soccer

The public is invited out to a naming ceremony on Friday afternoon at the Aldergrove Athletic Park.

VIDEO: Neighbours fear impact of B.C. tent city residents

Greater Victoria residents opposed to campers voice concerns at provincial campground

Breast density to be included in mammogram results across B.C.

The information is crucial in proactively reducing the risk of breast cancer, doctors say

Canada to boost support for riskier forms of renewable energy: minister

A $30-million contribution to a $117-million tidal project hopes to harness the immense power of the Bay of Fundy

B.C. watching Trans Mountain review, George Heyman says

Court decision stalling pipeline ‘validates’ environmental concerns

New concert series focuses on Fraser Valley musicians

Valley Music Co.’s Listen Local Concert Series begins Sept. 28 at High Street mall

Browns beat streak, win first NFL game in 635 days

Baker Mayfield erased any doubts about why the Browns selected him with the No. 1 overall pick

New silver collector coin features Indigenous dancer

New silver collectors coin captures fast-paced energy of an Indigenous powwow

VIDEO: Replica Haida totem pole raised at B.C. park

‘Reconciliation ceremony’ will include SFN leaders, provincial politicians

B.C. woman with autism has scooter stolen from SkyTrain station

Kayla Polege purchased scooter after ‘shutdowns’ on transit

Most Read