Election signs go up along the Willowbrook Connector in the Township of Langley. Miranda Gathercole Langley Times

Why election signs go up earlier in the Township of Langley

Township candidates have already started, Langley City counterparts have to wait

Campaign signs started appearing in the Township of Langley right after nominations for the Oct. 20 municipal elections opened on Sept. 4.

But they have yet to show up on Langley City streets, the result of regulations that forbid candidates from posting signs until after those same nominations close.

The result is Township candidates get an extra 10 days of roadside promotion, starting from the day nominations opened, while their City counterparts will have to wait until 4 p.m. on Sept. 14, when the nominations close.

It wasn’t supposed to be like that.

Township council actually approved a bylaw change that would have limited the time allowed for campaign signs to 20 days before the election.

But they did it during the July 9 evening meeting of council, after normal business hours, just missing a provincial deadline for passing election bylaws before the Oct. 20 municipal vote.

The minutes and video of the meeting show that Coun. Kim Richter, with the backing of Coun. Bob Long, wanted outdoor campaign signs banned until nominations closed, similar to Langley City.

The proposed motion noted that allowing placement to begin Sept. 4 would mean seven weeks of campaign signs — longer than usual for Langley Township.

“I think people are going to get fed up with signs,” Richter said.

Instead, council decided to restore a previous bylaw time limit for campaign signs that kept them from going up until 20 days before the election day, a period of just under three weeks.

But because council missed the deadline, the new restrictions won’t apply.

READ MORE: Big money and local elections

As it stands, the Township of Langley election signs bylaw sets out several restrictions on sign placement during an election, such as forbidding their placement “in such a way as to create a potential hazard to vehicular, pedestrian or cyclist traffic, and must not obstruct the view of any portion of a traffic control device, signal or intersection.”

Signs must be kept a minimum of 20 metres from any intersection.

Bylaw No. 5304 allows the Township of Langley to immediately remove signs that violate the bylaw.

For election or political signs on private property, residents are asked to contact legislative services at 604-533-6100 or email legservicesinfo@tol.ca.

For signs on streets or public property, contact bylaw enforcement at 604-532-7551 or engineering at 604-533-6006 or email enginfo@tol.ca.

Langley City restrictions include a requirement that signs “do not obstruct or otherwise interfere with sight lines or movement of motor vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists or any other, or obstruct the visibility of regulatory sign or other traffic control devices.”

More information about election rules in Langley City are available online at city.langley.bc.ca under “2018-local-government-election.”

Defacing, damaging or pulling down election or political signs anywhere is a criminal offence under the Criminal Code of Canada.

READ MORE: Times municipal election coverage

Other communities near the Langleys have different start dates for campaign signage.

Abbotsford allows campaign signs as soon as nominations open, while White Rock and Surrey forbid the posting of signs until nominations have closed.



dan.ferguson@langleytimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

UPDATED: Police looking at other collisions linked to impaired driver who allegedly struck Langley 12-year-old

One of two Friday hit-and-runs the driver is believed to be part of, Langley police say

Burnouts stressing out Langley’s Cruise-In board

A board member said the charity car show can’t allow burnouts for safety reasons

Langley land owned by man dead since 1922 needed for pipeline

Trans Mountain is looking for heirs so it can gain access to 500 square feet of land

VIDEO: Liberals make child care pledge, Greens unveil platform on Day 6 of campaign

Green party leader Elizabeth May unveils her party’s platform in Toronto

Canucks sign Brock Boeser to three-year, US$17.6-million deal

Young sniper will be in Vancouver Tuesday

B.C. forest industry looks to a high-technology future

Restructuring similar to Europe 15 years ago, executive says

RCMP conclude investigation into 2017 Elephant Hill wildfire

Files have been turned over to BC Prosecution Service

B.C. wants to be part of global resolution in opioid company bankruptcy claim

Government says settlement must include Canadian claims for devastation created by overdose crisis

Guilty plea in Lower Mainland break-and-enter spree

Gordon Vincent Gladstone, 42, was charged with 12 counts relating to a dozen incidents in late 2018

Vancouver police officer hit with bear spray mid-arrest

Officer had been trying to arrest a woman wanted province-wide

B.C. ends ‘birth alerts’ in child welfare cases

‘Social service workers will no longer share information about expectant parents without consent’

Chilliwack’s Belle Voci brings three-day a cappella festival to Fraser Valley

Singers will learn from two of Lower Mainland’s best music leaders at Belle Voci A Cappella Festival

Most Read