Horse Fed requests will be pricey

On Sept. 12, I attended Langley Township’s council meeting. I used to attend every council meeting and have a very good idea of what goes on within the walls at Township hall.

Editor:

On Sept. 12, I attended Langley Township’s council meeting. I used to attend every council meeting and have a very good idea of what goes on within the walls at Township hall.

As we all are aware, there is an election coming up this November. Lo and behold, the Langley Horse Federation sent “top gun”  David Esworthy to speak regarding what it intends to ask us taxpayers for in the near future.

Taxpayers, beware. The federation is not asking for small potatoes. Its requests could add up to $30 million.

It wants horse trails from Campbell Valley Park to Aldergrove, horse-oriented traffic signals at road crossings and even a horse events centre.

At one time the horse community, in my opinion, could make or break a politician. As a matter of fact, Rich Coleman had his office in the same building as the Horse Council of B.C.

But in the past few years, things seemed to have subsided. Then along comes the Langley Horse Federation. By commandeering businessman David Esworthy, it looks like the horse promoters are back.

Although the horse industry does generate business, so do many other businesses. For example, the custom car is king in Langley, and in a recent survey, the question was “Should Langley Speedway be rebuilt and re-opened for racing?” In that survey, 82.46 per cent said “yes.”

These should be times of restraint, not for projects with more tax increase implications.

Here are some thoughts I have on horses.  Why is it that a horse can dump all over public property, but a dog can’t without the owner being fined? Why do all dogs have to be licensed, even if they never leave their owners’ property?

This question has been asked at many all-candidates meetings, but no one has stepped up to the plate: Why should a horse not be licensed when on public property?

The fees obtained could go towards a vehicle that could go around to designated areas, and pick up all this contamination. Why is it that taxpayers have to pay to have thousands of gallons of perfectly good GVRD drinking water taken from a fire hydrant located in front of my property, and brought to Campbell Valley Park to fill a puddle, just for horses to jump over?

The Animal Control Bylaw 2005, no. 4440, states “areas must be kept free of manure , urine and other excrement, which shall be disposed of in a manner acceptable to the waste management branch of the ministry of environment.”

Another section states: “No person shall suffer or permit to leave or deposit excrement, manure or dung on any real property other than the owner’s, unless the owner should immediately take steps to remove such excrement, manure or dung and to dispose of same in a sanitary manner.”

So why do we allow these contaminants on our streets, which humans have to manoeuvre around when out for a drive or stroll?

I have lived in the Township for more than 20 years and we have ignored this issue long enough.

If you’re running in this next election, I’d like to see where you stand on this issue. By not responding, I will presume your answer is that you support the Horse Federation’s  future proposals, and the higher taxes that will be needed to fund this project.

Dennis Townsend, Langley