LETTER: Cloverdale-Langley City MP defends Impact Assessment Act

John Aldag has written to the Greater Langley Chamber of Commerce about Bill C-69.

Dear Editor,

I read with interest the chamber article in the paper concerning Bill C-69. While I support the advocacy work of the Chamber of Commerce, I must admit I was disappointed to see the Conservative Party’s rhetoric reflected in their letter. The legislation addresses the loss in trust by investors and Canadians that resulted from changes made by the previous government to key pieces of legislation including the Environmental Assessment Act.

Here is a letter I sent to the chamber, which your readers might find useful explaining why I feel that C-69 will enable energy projects to proceed:

In response to your concerns, I would like to highlight some background on Bill C-69. The Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 was replaced by the Impact Assessment Act, not to create increased red tape and bureaucracy, but to ensure that the environment and economy can grow together.

The rules set out in Bill C-69 will see protection of our environment, fish, and waterways while respecting Indigenous rights. By taking the environmental impacts of projects into account, and ensuring indigenous consultation takes place, good projects can move forward and create new jobs to grow the economy. This will encourage investment in Canadian projects and minimize uncertainty for potential investors. It is imperative that environmental protection is considered with all major projects; economic growth should not come at the cost of our environment.

During the 2015 federal election, the Liberal Party of Canada ran on a platform that included commitments to restore the credibility to environmental assessments; modernize and rebuild trust in the National Energy Board; and conduct a wholesale review of the previous government’s amendments to the Fisheries Act and elimination of the Navigable Waters Protection Act. The intent is to restore protections and incorporate more modern safeguards. I was largely inspired to run based on this platform and felt strongly about the importance of restoring trust in the environmental review process that was damaged by the Harper government.

I personally sat on the review panel for Bill C-69 and have listened to many hours of testimony. I can assure you the Trudeau government is focused on doing the due diligence necessary to ensure TMX is built.

Following the Federal Court of Appeal’s guidance, the National Energy Board was instructed to reconsider its recommendation on the TMX project, considering the environmental impacts of project-related marine shipping. On Feb. 22, 2019, after an intensive 22-week reconsideration process, the NEB submitted its report on the project with an overall recommendation that the Trans Mountain Expansion Project is in the Canadian public interest and should be approved subject to 156 conditions and 16 new recommendations to the Government of Canada.

I agree that increased rail traffic is a poor alternative to a pipeline and is hazardous to public safety. As a result, it’s important that TMX is moved forward correctly to ensure the best possible outcome for all stakeholders. TMX will not be subject to Bill C-69 and must only satisfy the NEB’s recommendations and conditions.

John Aldag, Member of Parliament Cloverdale-Langley City

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Aldergrove zoo to reopen next week with new COVID-19 safety measures: spokesperson

Reopening to be ushered in by words from Darryl Plecas, Legislative assembly Speaker

School speed limits in force in Langley

Langley RCMP are asking pedestrians and drivers to be cautious as school resumes

There’s still Hope After Stroke during COVID-19

Program facilitator remains available by phone

Hot rods parade by Langley hospital at seven o’clock for front line workers

Few dozen from BC Hot Rod Association paraded their cars in private show for staff and seniors

Anyone participating in virtual Langley Walk this weekend?

Residents have until Sunday, May 31 to complete annual 5K challenge

Only four new COVID-19 cases, 228 active across B.C.

Health officials watching as activities ramp up

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

Thanks for helping the Aldergrove Star to continue its mission to provide trusted local news

Feds looking at ways to reunite families amid COVID-19 border restrictions with U.S.

Some families with members of dual-citizenship have become separated due to the pandemic

Condition in kids with possible COVID-19 link being studied in Canada

This month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an alert to doctors about MIS-C

‘I knew what he wanted’: Kootenay man spends hours in tree as black bear patrols below

Francis Levasseur is no stranger to the outdoors, but a recent run-in with a bear caused quite a scare

COVID cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a BC mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Trudeau acknowledges racial unrest in U.S.; ‘We also have work to do in Canada’

‘Anti-black racism, racism, is real; it’s in the United States, but it’s also in Canada,’ Trudeau says

State of Local Emergency declared for Boundary as communities brace for river flooding

Warm weather and heavy rain could cause sections of Kettle River system to swell beyond 2018 levels

Large cruise ships barred from Canadian waters until end of October: Garneau

Last year 140 cruise ships brought more than two million visitors to Canadian ports

Most Read