LETTER: Pact doesn’t limit sovereignty

One Langley letter writer says mbracing multiculturalism is such a positive and rewarding experience

Dear Editor,

It was with a very heavy heart that I read the article in the Langley Times newspaper dated Dec. 12, entitled Protestors Opposing UN Immigration Pact.

In the article, a protestor claimed that Canadians will be compelled to promote the cultures of immigrants over their own.

It was also reported by Tanya Gaw of the Canadian Coalition for Responsible Government that Canada’s rule of law is founded only on Judeo-Christian principles inherited through our British Commonwealth, and also through the Magna Carta.

She also stated that this is in complete contrast to the totalitarian, communist and socialist cultures that these migrants are fleeing from.

The article also stated that the federal minister of immigration and refugees and citizenship has explained that the UN pact would be a useful framework that is not legally binding on the nations that adopt parts or all of it.

This pact is not a means to limit sovereignty.

Canada, in her diversity, has welcomed refugees fleeing persecution and war, and for that I am proud to call myself a Canadian.

Refugees are fleeing many areas of the world, and yes, they may be culturally different from us, whether it be with differences of religious belief, ethnicity, or language, but the very common bond that we all hold dear is our value for freedom and rights within our diversity.

Additionally, we recognize as Canadians the need to afford kindness, compassion and aid to others.

Whether of the Buddhist faith, the Jewish faith, the Christian faith, the Muslim faith, the Jainist faith, the Hindu faith, the humanist philosophy, or any of other spiritual faiths or even of no faith, our common humanity and humility should be our principled governing forces for welcoming and aiding others.

Our First Nations peoples are the true first inhabitants of our nation of Canada and great respect is due to these people in recognizing their rights and status as First Peoples.

I have felt privileged in having been able to meet many diverse families throughout a career in teaching, having taught children from different religions, different cultural backgrounds, and also for teaching in a community of mostly First Nations people. The commonality that I experienced was that aside from cultural or religious differences, these parents wanted for their children to feel acceptance and experience kindness, and for their own children to be kind and compassionate as well.

I sincerely hope these protestors can take a closer look at their beliefs and perhaps do an outreach to others who may have belief systems different from their own to ensure that refugees are supported and welcomed with care, respect and inclusion. Embracing multiculturalism is such a positive and rewarding experience.

Fiona Mason, Langley

RELATED: Question of the week: Are you fearful the proposed United Nations immigration compact will strip Canada of its rights to control immigration?

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