gun laws

Langley MP Tako Popta was joined by Bob Zimmer, MP for Prince George-Peace River-Northern Rockies; Tracey Wilson, vice president of Club Outreach Canadian Coalition for Firearm Rights (CCFR), and Michael Loberg, general counsel of CCFR for a firearm town hall earlier this money. (Special to The Star)

More than 150 participants join Aldergrove MP Tako van Popta’s virtual town hall

Panelists discussed firearm legislation through Zoom last week

 

Tako van Popta, MP for Langley-Aldergrove. (Tako van Popta/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Langley MP Tako van Popta to hold virtual town hall to discuss firearm legislation

A lot of my constituents have serious concerns about how Bill C-21 will affect them, van Popta says

 

Gun owners hold signs criticizing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as they participate in a rally organized by the Canadian Coalition for Firearm Rights against the government’s new gun regulations, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Pro-gun marchers speak out on federal government’s assault weapon ban

Trudeau government announced in May that it was banning the use, sale and import of assault weapons into Canada

 

A restricted gun licence holder holds a AR-15 at his home in Langley, B.C., on May 1, 2020. The federal government is turning to the private sector to design and run a massive buyback of newly prohibited firearms. Public Safety Canada has invited 15 consulting firms to come up with a “range of options and approaches” for the planned program to compensate gun owners. The Liberals outlawed a wide range of firearms in May, saying the guns were designed for the battlefield, not hunting or sport shooting. The ban covers some 1,500 models and variants of what the government considers assault-style weapons, meaning they can no longer be legally used, sold or imported. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Feds seeking private consultant to design firearm buyback program

The ban covers some 1,500 models and variants of what the government considers assault-style weapons

A restricted gun licence holder holds a AR-15 at his home in Langley, B.C., on May 1, 2020. The federal government is turning to the private sector to design and run a massive buyback of newly prohibited firearms. Public Safety Canada has invited 15 consulting firms to come up with a “range of options and approaches” for the planned program to compensate gun owners. The Liberals outlawed a wide range of firearms in May, saying the guns were designed for the battlefield, not hunting or sport shooting. The ban covers some 1,500 models and variants of what the government considers assault-style weapons, meaning they can no longer be legally used, sold or imported. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
(The Canadian Press)

Limit gun capacity to five bullets, victims group urges Trudeau government

Current limits are generally five bullets for hunting rifles and shotguns and 10 for handguns.

(The Canadian Press)
Langley-Aldergrove MP Tako van Popta took the Canadian Firearms Safety Course this past February. (Tako van Popta/Special to the Langley Advance Times)

Langley-Aldergrove MP Tako van Popta issues statement on assault-style rifle ban

van Popta is in favor of responsible ownership but opposes ‘government’s ineffective firearms policy’

Langley-Aldergrove MP Tako van Popta took the Canadian Firearms Safety Course this past February. (Tako van Popta/Special to the Langley Advance Times)