Indigenous

This carved figure was returned to kʷikʷəƛ̓əm (Kwikwetlem) First Nation on Jan. 9, 2023. It was stolen on Oct. 12, 2022 from Coquitlam and found in a basement suite in Chilliwack on Dec. 28, 2022. (RCMP)

Carved figure stolen from Kwikwetlem First Nation found in Chilliwack basement suite

‘This is the outcome we hoped for but did not expect,’ says Coquitlam RCMP

This carved figure was returned to kʷikʷəƛ̓əm (Kwikwetlem) First Nation on Jan. 9, 2023. It was stolen on Oct. 12, 2022 from Coquitlam and found in a basement suite in Chilliwack on Dec. 28, 2022. (RCMP)
Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, former B.C. Representative for Children and Youth, speaks to a reporter in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond no longer employed with UBC

Cutting of ties follows questions into scholar’s claims of Indigenous ancestry

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond, former B.C. Representative for Children and Youth, speaks to a reporter in Vancouver, B.C., on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Kwantlen First Nation Chief Marilyn Gabriel spoke at the opening of the new hospice residence, offering a prayer with her husband and son. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)

Year In Review: Competing councils claimed leadership of Kwantlen First Nation

A movement to end hereditary leadership elected its own council in 2022

Kwantlen First Nation Chief Marilyn Gabriel spoke at the opening of the new hospice residence, offering a prayer with her husband and son. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)
College Nordique language school coordinator Rosie Benning (left) and Tlicho language teacher Georgina Frankie are shown in a handout photo. Indigenous languages are spoken and heard everyday across the North thanks to dedicated elders, teachers, translators and broadcasters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Rosie Benning
College Nordique language school coordinator Rosie Benning (left) and Tlicho language teacher Georgina Frankie are shown in a handout photo. Indigenous languages are spoken and heard everyday across the North thanks to dedicated elders, teachers, translators and broadcasters. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Rosie Benning
The former lelem’ Café in Fort Langley has been closed since the spring of 2021. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)

Former lelem’ café to be sold by Langley Township

New public bidding process will allow for transparent sale

The former lelem’ Café in Fort Langley has been closed since the spring of 2021. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)
Minister of Environment and Climate Change Steven Guilbeault, left, and Northwest Territories MLA for Nahendeh Shane Thompson bow during a prayer performed via videoconference and shown on screen during a news conference at the COP 15 summit on biodiversity, in Montreal, Saturday, Dec. 17, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter McCabe

Feds, Northwest Territories to create Indigenous protected area for Great Bear Lake

‘It will be a place of refuge for the future of people, for all living things.’

Minister of Environment and Climate Change Steven Guilbeault, left, and Northwest Territories MLA for Nahendeh Shane Thompson bow during a prayer performed via videoconference and shown on screen during a news conference at the COP 15 summit on biodiversity, in Montreal, Saturday, Dec. 17, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter McCabe
Commissioner Justice Murray Sinclair, Commissioner Chief Wilton Littlechild and Commissioner Marie Wilson (right to left) listen to a speaker as the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation commission is released, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015 in Ottawa. Seven years later, an Indigenous-led think tank says progress is moving at a “glacial pace.”THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Progress on Indigenous reconciliation calls to action going at ‘glacial pace’: report

2 of the report’s 94 calls to action completed this year — bringing the total completed so far to 13

Commissioner Justice Murray Sinclair, Commissioner Chief Wilton Littlechild and Commissioner Marie Wilson (right to left) listen to a speaker as the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation commission is released, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015 in Ottawa. Seven years later, an Indigenous-led think tank says progress is moving at a “glacial pace.”THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
FILE-First Nations Health Authority deputy chief medical officer Dr. Nel Wieman speaks during a press conference at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on February 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Cultural safety standard will force accountability in B.C. health care for Indigenous peoples

New guide comes alongside findings of widespread anti-Indigenous racism

  • Dec 12, 2022
FILE-First Nations Health Authority deputy chief medical officer Dr. Nel Wieman speaks during a press conference at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on February 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
A wind turbine is shown at a wind farm near Pincher Creek, Alta., Wednesday, March 9, 2016. An energy-focused think tank says Indigenous energy sovereignty in Canada’s North is “absolutely critical and fundamental” to addressing climate change, but more support is needed. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Indigenous communities leading the switch to renewable energy in the North

Action vital as territories warming at two to four times the global average

A wind turbine is shown at a wind farm near Pincher Creek, Alta., Wednesday, March 9, 2016. An energy-focused think tank says Indigenous energy sovereignty in Canada’s North is “absolutely critical and fundamental” to addressing climate change, but more support is needed. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Greenpeace activists hoist a banner titled “Protect Nature, Protect Life,” in Montreal, Thursday, December 8, 2022, as COP15, the UN Biodiversity Conference, continues. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Efforts to protect nature at COP15 will fail without Indigenous people, leaders say

‘Indigenous governance and guardianship has been more effective than protected areas.’

Greenpeace activists hoist a banner titled “Protect Nature, Protect Life,” in Montreal, Thursday, December 8, 2022, as COP15, the UN Biodiversity Conference, continues. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief, RoseAnne Archibald, speaks during the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly (SCA) in Ottawa, on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. Chiefs at the Assembly of First Nations are set to vote on whether to publicly oppose Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s proposed gun-control legislation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Spencer Colby

First Nations leaders reject Trudeau’s proposed gun law, citing risk to treaty rights

Chiefs at the Assembly of First Nations also oppose Alberta, Saskatchewan sovereignty bills

Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief, RoseAnne Archibald, speaks during the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly (SCA) in Ottawa, on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. Chiefs at the Assembly of First Nations are set to vote on whether to publicly oppose Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s proposed gun-control legislation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Spencer Colby
Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief, RoseAnne Archibald, speaks during the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly (SCA) in Ottawa, on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Spencer Colby

Murray Sinclair to help AFN with conflict resolution after ‘turmoil’: national chief

Conflict played out in public during the last AFN gathering in Vancouver in July

Assembly of First Nations (AFN) National Chief, RoseAnne Archibald, speaks during the AFN Special Chiefs Assembly (SCA) in Ottawa, on Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Spencer Colby
A dead chum salmon in the Delta River after it had returned more than 1,000 miles from the ocean to spawn. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)

Keepers of Cheewaht: Restoring a Vancouver Island ecosystem for generations to come

After years of neglect, salmon are returning to remote West Coast river system

A dead chum salmon in the Delta River after it had returned more than 1,000 miles from the ocean to spawn. (Courtesy Photo / Ned Rozell)
The National Centre for Indigenous Laws at the University of Victoria is expected to open in 2024. (Black Press Media file photo)

Construction starts on B.C.’s $27 million National Centre for Indigenous Laws

University of Victoria home to first joint degree in Indigenous legal orders and Canadian common law

The National Centre for Indigenous Laws at the University of Victoria is expected to open in 2024. (Black Press Media file photo)
A memorial totem pole is shown in this handout image provided by National Museums Scotland. The museum says it will return to the Nisga’a Nation in British Columbia a memorial pole taken nearly a century ago. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-National Museums Scotland

B.C. Nisga’a totem on display at Scotland museum since 1930 is heading home

Delegation of Nisga’a leaders travelled to Edinburgh last August to ask that the pole be returned

A memorial totem pole is shown in this handout image provided by National Museums Scotland. The museum says it will return to the Nisga’a Nation in British Columbia a memorial pole taken nearly a century ago. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-National Museums Scotland
cə̓q̓cq̓am (Thunder) Ryan Oliverius of Okanagan Indian Band (OKIB) and Shayla Raine, a nehiyaw iskwew from Louis Bull Tribe, have created a docu-series together called Decolonizing Wellness. (Submitted photo)

B.C. documentary series explores couple’s journey to decolonize wellness

Couple experiments with cutting out phones and TV, meditating in nature and making hand drums

  • Dec 1, 2022
cə̓q̓cq̓am (Thunder) Ryan Oliverius of Okanagan Indian Band (OKIB) and Shayla Raine, a nehiyaw iskwew from Louis Bull Tribe, have created a docu-series together called Decolonizing Wellness. (Submitted photo)
In this image taken from video, Canadian law enforcement personnel surrounded a residence on the James Smith Cree First Nation reservation in Saskatchewan on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, as they search for a suspect in a series of stabbings. The federal government is to spend $1.2 million to repair and replace houses damaged during the stabbings. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Robert Bumsted

Ottawa to spend $1.2 million to replace and repair homes after mass stabbing

Houses became crime scenes after 11 people died and 18 were injured

In this image taken from video, Canadian law enforcement personnel surrounded a residence on the James Smith Cree First Nation reservation in Saskatchewan on Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2022, as they search for a suspect in a series of stabbings. The federal government is to spend $1.2 million to repair and replace houses damaged during the stabbings. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Robert Bumsted
Traevon Desjarlais-Chalifoux, 17, was found dead in a closet of an Abbotsford group home in September 2020 after being reported missing four days earlier. His mother testified on the first day of a coroners’ inquest into his death on Nov. 28, 2022. (Credit: GoFundMe)

Mother of Cree teen who died in B.C. group home testifies at coroners’ inquest

Traevon Desjarlais found four days after reported missing in 2020

Traevon Desjarlais-Chalifoux, 17, was found dead in a closet of an Abbotsford group home in September 2020 after being reported missing four days earlier. His mother testified on the first day of a coroners’ inquest into his death on Nov. 28, 2022. (Credit: GoFundMe)
Auditor general Karen Hogan speaks at a news conference in Ottawa on Tuesday, November 15, 2022. Canada’s auditor general says Ottawa cannot pin its lack of action on fixing emergency management on First Nations to how it first needs to hear from communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Patrick Doyle

Feds must deliver ‘concrete actions’ to fix emergency response on First Nations: AG

Canada spending 3.5 times more money helping First Nations recover than helping them prepare

Auditor general Karen Hogan speaks at a news conference in Ottawa on Tuesday, November 15, 2022. Canada’s auditor general says Ottawa cannot pin its lack of action on fixing emergency management on First Nations to how it first needs to hear from communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Patrick Doyle
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lays tobacco in front of a grave of one of the victims of a mass stabbing at James Smith Cree Nation, Sask., on Monday, Nov. 28, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Heywood Yu

Trudeau visits First Nation in Saskatchewan rocked by stabbings that killed 11

PM scheduled to spend part of the day in meetings with leaders and community members

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lays tobacco in front of a grave of one of the victims of a mass stabbing at James Smith Cree Nation, Sask., on Monday, Nov. 28, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Heywood Yu