An aerial magnetic survey of mineral deposits has added to previous work by private companies to encourage exploratory drilling in the area of B.C. hit hard by the mountain pine beetle epidemic.

B.C. promotes search for new mines

The B.C. government is aiming to reverse a slide in mineral exploration investment with tax credits and a new exploration survey

The B.C. government is aiming to reverse a slide in mineral exploration investment that has come after world metal prices peaked and then declined to a 10-year average level in the past two years.

Premier Christy Clark and Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett helped open the annual Association for Mineral Exploration B.C.’s conference in Vancouver Monday with a pair of announcements.

Clark told delegates the province’s mining exploration tax credit will be extended for another year in the B.C. budget to be tabled in February. That is expected to provide $10 million for exploration.

Geoscience BC, an industry research organization started by the province in 2005, also released results of its latest aerial survey to identify new mineral potential in the B.C. Interior.

“Every time GeoscienceBC does a project like this, in the ensuing three or four years you see a significant bump in exploration activity in the area where the survey was done,” Bennett said in an interview.

He added that much of B.C.’s Interior is covered by glacial till from the ice age that ended 10,000 years ago, making traditional mineral prospecting impossible over large areas.

He said the tax credit is similar to what B.C. provides for deep drilling and other unconventional natural gas exploration, but on a smaller scale. It supports junior mining companies and is not a subsidy to established corporations, he said.

Clark told the mining conference that the government is halfway to its election commitment of 17 new and expanded mines in B.C., including the new Mt. Milligan copper mine and others that have received permits.

She also referred to the need for a review of B.C.’s environmental assessment system.

“My belief is that the process over the years has gotten less certain, less predictable, and probably not as efficient as people would like,” Clark told reporters after her speech.

 

Just Posted

Canadian Museum of Flight volunteer was there from the beginning

Fond memories as the Langley aviation history exhibition readies for the holidays

VIDEO: Giants earn seventh straight win while playing at Pacific Coliseum

G-Men return home for their next game at the Langley Events Centre Friday against the Silvertips.

VIDEO: Aldergrove Children’s Christmas Party

Princesses aplenty along with Santa and Mrs. Claus, ballon animals and face painting

VIDEO: Celebrity Christmas food and toy drive in Langley

Annual event helps families and abuse victims

VIDEO: This B.C. school leads country in vaccine donations to UNICEF

Federally funded Kids Boost Immunity uses quizzes to earn vaccinations

Natural gas rates will go up in B.C. on Jan. 1

Regions could pay up to $68 more

Top House Dems raise prospect of impeachment, jail for Trump

It could be an “impeachable offense” if it’s proven that President Donald Trump directed illegal hush-money payments to women during the 2016 campaign.

Macron addresses France amid protests; is it too late?

Paris monuments reopened, cleanup workers cleared debris and shop owners tried to put the city on its feet again Sunday.

CUPE calls off Flair Airlines job action citing job security concerns

The union says it’s going to challenge Flair’s move at the Canada Industrial Relations Board before proceeding with any job action.

Trump looking at several candidates for new chief of staff

Trump’s top pick for the job, Nick Ayers, is out of the running and Trump is now soliciting input on at least four individuals.

Canadian physicist collects Nobel Prize

Canada’s Donna Strickland is one of three winners of this year’s Nobel Prize for Physics.

BCHL players help Team Canada in shootout win over U.S.

Massimo Rizzo scores the shootout winner at World Junior A Challenge

Canada Post backlog, Greyhound exit creating headaches ahead of the holidays

The federal government forced members of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers back to their jobs late last month

Most Read