A taco lunch, as well as barbecues, sundae bars, handwritten thank you notes, and other engagement efforts are designed to keep Cintas staff happy at work. (Special to Black Press)

CAREER FAIR: Black Press Media Extreme Career Fair hosts 110 employers in Cloverdale

Don’t miss an opportunity to get hired with Black Press Extreme Career Fair

TODAY: The Black Press Extreme Education & Career Fair is being held at the Cloverdale Agriplex (17792 62nd Ave.) on Thursday, Sept. 13, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

It’s a constant struggle – as it is for most businesses today – to find talented people to augment existing and growing operations.

But for Cintas, a Fortune 500 company with a large plant in Langley, introducing a new and different approach to finding those individuals has been paying dividends.

The company has an innovative and evolving recruitment philosophy, explained Sam Ahuja, human resources manager with the local Cintas plant.

“Gone are the days where people were applying for positions,” she said. “So, we’re more outsourcing candidates. We’re going out and finding them, like a sales rep would. We’re going to the different gyms, churches, temples.”

While head office for Cintas is in Cincinnati, the Langley plant is one of its five largest operations – providing uniforms, mats, restroom supplies, safety material, and other facility services and products to businesses throughout North America.

CLICK TO: Watch and learn more about the company culture

The Cintas plant in Aldergrove’s Gloucester Estates employs about 280 people, and is always looking for new talent as it continues to expand, Ahuja said.

“We have not slowed down on growing… it’s a good problem to have.”

But the growth has not been without its challenges, and keeping up with recruitment of quality staff has been one of the hurdles.

To assist with the ongoing quest for more people, they’re taking a relatively new, more “sales-oriented approach” to recruiting, Ahuja said. They’re headhunting.

And, one of the most effective ways they’ve found to connect with those potential candidates is by offering financial incentives to existing staff – or partners, as they prefer to call them.

As for the incentives, she said that while the company has long offered referral fees to its team, during the past eight months, Cintas has upped the remuneration for those helping to recruit candidates – the company now offers anywhere from $250 to $1,500 (depending on the position being filled) payable on the candidate’s start date.

“Motivating our current partners to find talent for us is a big help because they’re talking to their neighbours or going to different social events,” and convincing what Ahuja calls passive candidates to consider a move to Cintas based on their own experiences with the company.

In taking on a much more aggressive headhunting approach, the human resources team is also recruiting people who may not have even thought of making a move – at least not until they heard Cintas’ offer.

Most of these candidates are people who are already employed elsewhere, Ahuja said. So to accommodate their current work schedule, her human resources team meets with them after 5 p.m. or conducts interviews on weekend.

 

A sundae bar, as well as barbecues, handwritten thank you notes, and other engagement efforts are designed to keep Cintas staff happy at work. (Special to Black Press)

A taco lunch, as well as barbecues, sundae bars, handwritten thank you notes, and other engagement efforts are designed to keep Cintas staff happy at work. (Special to Black Press)

A taco lunch, as well as barbecues, sundae bars, handwritten thank you notes, and other engagement efforts are designed to keep Cintas staff happy at work. (Special to Black Press)

A taco lunch, as well as barbecues, sundae bars, handwritten thank you notes, and other engagement efforts are designed to keep Cintas staff happy at work. (Special to Black Press)

A taco lunch, as well as barbecues, sundae bars, handwritten thank you notes, and other engagement efforts are designed to keep Cintas staff happy at work. (Special to Black Press)

Just Posted

Extradition hearing set for Langley developer accused of fraud

Mark Chandler will go before the B.C. Court of Appeals early next year.

Aldergrove remembers generous spirit of John Jones

Aldergrove Athletic Park soccer field to be named after community leader

Langley hosts woman whose story inspired Orange Shirt Day

A Williams Lake woman has been in schools this week and gives a public presentation Saturday.

Risk of thunderstorm this afternoon for Vancouver Island and Lower Mainland

A special weather statement calls for heavy rain and wind over the next 48 hours

Field renamed to honour champion of Langley soccer

The public is invited out to a naming ceremony on Friday afternoon at the Aldergrove Athletic Park.

VIDEO: Neighbours fear impact of B.C. tent city residents

Greater Victoria residents opposed to campers voice concerns at provincial campground

Breast density to be included in mammogram results across B.C.

The information is crucial in proactively reducing the risk of breast cancer, doctors say

Canada to boost support for riskier forms of renewable energy: minister

A $30-million contribution to a $117-million tidal project hopes to harness the immense power of the Bay of Fundy

B.C. watching Trans Mountain review, George Heyman says

Court decision stalling pipeline ‘validates’ environmental concerns

New concert series focuses on Fraser Valley musicians

Valley Music Co.’s Listen Local Concert Series begins Sept. 28 at High Street mall

Browns beat streak, win first NFL game in 635 days

Baker Mayfield erased any doubts about why the Browns selected him with the No. 1 overall pick

New silver collector coin features Indigenous dancer

New silver collectors coin captures fast-paced energy of an Indigenous powwow

VIDEO: Replica Haida totem pole raised at B.C. park

‘Reconciliation ceremony’ will include SFN leaders, provincial politicians

B.C. woman with autism has scooter stolen from SkyTrain station

Kayla Polege purchased scooter after ‘shutdowns’ on transit

Most Read