Valley Therapeutic Equestrian Association president Lynn Moseley gives the non-profit’s horses a treat. (Ryan Uytdewilligen/Black Press Media)

Valley Therapeutic Equestrian Association president Lynn Moseley gives the non-profit’s horses a treat. (Ryan Uytdewilligen/Black Press Media)

Charities celebrate return of Cruise-In

Welcome news to Valley Therapeutic Equestrian Association and Langley Community Services Society

Word that the Langley Good Times Cruise-In will return was good news for two local charities that are supported by the annual car show – Valley Therapeutic Equestrian Association (VTEA) , the Langley Community Support Groups Society – and all the people they help.

Lynn Moseley, VTEA director, said the Aldergrove-based non-profit organization has been busy during the pandemic, adding new services while modifying their existing programs.

“Since COVID hit, we have been focusing on mental health challenges,” Moseley explained. “We pivoted to offering different therapies including counselling and equine-assisted learning.”

Located at 256th Street, just south of the Fraser Highway, the VTEA has been providing therapeutic horseback riding and hippotherapy treatments since 1983.

While VTEA has managed to weather the storm created by the pandemic “so far,” Moseley said the financial support provided by Cruise-In through the years has made a huge difference.

READ ALSO: Lower Mainlanders suffering from grief or anxiety can sign up for horse-riding therapy

“Even though we are primarily a volunteer organization, running an equine centre is costly,” Moseley elaborated.

“Without donors like them [Cruise-In], it would be very hard for us to deliver the services we do. We’re so appreciative and we certainly missed not being a part of the event last year. We also like to participate and help them out.”

The funds donated to VTEA go towards their various equine-assisted therapeutic programs, and in turn, to those we serve in the community, Moseley elaborated.

“To say we are incredibly thankful for their generous support over the many years is an understatement. We can’t wait to participate in their next event – we look forward to it every year.”

Help is always welcome and if anyone wishes to contribute or learn more about VTEA, they can visit www.vtea.ca.

READ ALSO: There’s still Hope After Stroke during COVID-19

Langley Community Support Groups Society operates Hope After Stroke groups for local stroke survivors and relies heavily on donations from the annual Langley Good Times Cruise-In.

It has operated a program at the Walnut Grove Community Centre for more than 25 years, and founder and executive director Marilyn Piticco said she is beyond grateful Cruise-In is going ahead.

COVID-19 shut down most of her in-person services and left Piticco scrambling for funding to keep the service going.

Marilyn Piticco accepted a $10,000 donation from Cruise-In’s Bruce Pihan and Wayne Patterson after the 2018 charity car show. (file)

Marilyn Piticco accepted a $10,000 donation from Cruise-In’s Bruce Pihan and Wayne Patterson after the 2018 charity car show. (file)

“We have been so fortunate and we wouldn’t be able to keep our doors open without their support,” Piticco said, pointing to Cruise-In. “We believe and they believe in the program.”

Piticco’s non-profit aims to offer counselling services and programs for stroke survivors.

“Cruise-In has supported us for well over 10 years,” she noted.

Resources for the Hope after Stroke program can be found at www.facebook.com/Langley-Community-Support-Groups-Society. People can also contact Pititcco by phone at (604) 882-4672.

Since its inception in 1997, Cruise-In has contributed more than $1.3 million to local causes.

Cruise-In also allows a variety of local service clubs and groups to run concessions during the car show so they can also raise funds.

– with files from Ryan Uytdewilligen


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