B.C. dam projects moving ahead

Biologists install a rotary screw fish trap in the Peace River

BC Hydro is proceeding with its $800 million refit of the Ruskin dam in the Fraser Valley, and beginning formal environmental review of a new design for the Site C dam in B.C.’s northeast.

The estimated price tag for Site C has jumped from $6.6 billion to $7.9 billion, for the third dam on the Peace River and likely the last big hydro dam to be built in the province. BC Hydro updated a 30-year-old design for Site C to increase its output by 20 per cent to supply 450,000 homes a year.

The 80-year-old Ruskin dam is slated for an major reconstruction to improve earthquake safety and increase output by 10 per cent to supply 33,000 homes.

Coleman sent BC Hydro “back to the drawing board” on Ruskin, seeking ways to ease steep rate increases coming to B.C. power customers to pay for its province-wide surge of upgrades and new construction. In an interview Wednesday, Coleman said he isn’t quite finished his review, and plans to tour the Ruskin site, but it has become clear to him that work should proceed at Ruskin as well as the John Hart dam at Campbell River.

“The challenge with both the Ruskin and John Hart dams is that they have signifiant downstream environmental impacts if they’re not there now, because the salmon spawning area is actually below the height of the dams,” Coleman said. “Plus [at Ruskin] there are industrial users down below, a couple of shake mills and also some residential stuff, so you have to look at the whole thing.”

It is technically possible to lower Hayward Lake near Mission over time and decommission the Ruskin dam, but Coleman said after studying the business case, he agrees with BC Hydro that it should be kept as a steady source of power in the densely populated Lower Mainland.

NDP energy critic John Horgan predicted that the $8 billion estimate for Site C will rise again before the projected completion date of 2020. Because the B.C. Liberal government exempted Site C and other big projects from independent review, it’s not clear if B.C. really needs the power to meet domestic supply, he said.

“I think we’ve got a couple of billion dollars more to go before we’re done, and that’s why we need to have, not politicians making these decisions, not self-appointed bureaucrats, but the independent B.C. Utilities Commission,” Horgan said.

Coleman said he’s satisfied that the Ruskin project can pay for itself in 12 years, and the John Hart upgrade will recover its costs in 10 years. Those estimates include rate hikes that could total 50 per cent in the next five years.

Coleman said Site C will help power a wave of industrial growth in northern B.C., from the 100-year supply of natural gas in the Horn River and Montney shales to at least four and as many as six new mines supplied by a new power line into northwest B.C.

Just Posted

Langley’s Queen of pantomime sets sail Friday on ‘a sea of hilarity’

Langley’s Ellie King describes her newest undertaking as rollicking, comical panto.

Langley School District Foundation volunteers tackle wrapping projects of all sizes, shapes

This year’s wrap money goes to food and homeless initiatives.

Langley safe houses over capacity for Christmas

Ishtar Society having to turn away families fleeing violence

Crown appeals stay against Jamie Bacon in Surrey Six killings

B.C.’s prosecution service says judge’s decision reveals ‘errors of law’

Arrest warrant issued for Langley City man

David Main is wanted on numerous charges including obstructing an officer

VIDEO: New series takes in-depth look at sexual harassment in B.C.

Black Press takes a hard look at sexual harassment in B.C.

Accused NYC subway bomber expected to face federal charges

Akayed Ullah, 27, was charged Tuesday with terrorism and weapons related charges

Strategy announced for Indigenous cancer care

Various stakeholders have come together to provide a road map from prevention to survivorship

Environmental groups slam NDP decision to continue with Site C

Construction industry, meanwhile, is cautiously optimistic about how the project will look

Langley’s Marley and Cratchit bring spirit of giving to life

Local accountants will act as characters from A Christmas Carol for a fundraiser.

B.C. Conservatives applaud Site C decision

B.C. Conservatives happy with government decision to proceed

Hwy. 1 avalanche improvements promise less delays

B.C.’s new remote avalanche-control systems near Revelstoke are ready for avalanche season

Rare summer tanager delights Vancouver bird watchers

It’s the first time that bird has been recorded in the Metro Vancouver area

2017 word of the year: Feminism

Merriam-Webster’s word of the year for 2017: ‘Feminism’

Most Read