Dolores Peters has signs calling for people to slow down on her 42nd Avenue home. She’s hoping the Township will try traffic calming measures for the street. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)

Dolores Peters has signs calling for people to slow down on her 42nd Avenue home. She’s hoping the Township will try traffic calming measures for the street. (Matthew Claxton/Langley Advance Times)

Brookswood woman calls for slower traffic on residential road

42nd Avenue is one of the few through streets between 200th and 208th

A Brookswood resident said she’s hoping Langley Township or the RCMP will help slow down speeders on her residential road.

Dolores Peter said 42nd Avenue has become the go-to route for drivers who want to get between 200th Street and 208th Street as fast as possible.

There are only three roads in Brookswood that go straight through between the two major north-south arteries of 200th and 208th – 42nd Avenue, 40th Avenue, and 36th Avenue.

Peter noted there is a school zone, for Belmont Elementary, on 40th, as well as one on 44th to the north, a road that only goes to 204th Street

In addition, there are multiple parks on 36th Avenue, so all of the east-west routes have slower speed limits or traffic calming measures already in place.

That leaves 42nd Avenue, which has one four-way stop sign between 200th and 208th, and no school or park zones.

There have been some significant crashes on the road in past years, and Peter worries about the fact that there are no true sidewalks for people to walk on, only paved shoulders.

Peter said she’s been asking the Township for some traffic calming measures on 42nd Avenue for years.

One thing she thinks would help would be another stop sign at side streets, such as 201A Street.

“It would kind of slow things down,” she said.

According to a Township media spokesperson, the Township has more than 100 areas where locals have requested traffic calming.

As a collector road, 42nd Avenue is eligible for traffic calming, but isn’t a high priority due to the lack of a school or playground, the Township said.

Langley has seen a number of long-simmering controversies around speeding and even street-racing on various local roads in the past few years.

Speed humps at intersections were put in on Zero Avenue more than a decade ago to slow down speeding drivers, and modifications to 16th Avenue have included more traffic signals, as well as pullouts so police could set up radar traps. Even rural Allard Crescent along the Fraser River west of Fort Langley had issues with street racing in the past.

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