A nurse prepares to vaccinate healthcare workers at a COVID-19 drive-thru immunization site in Coquitlam in this image supplied to the media by Fraser Health on March 8, 2021. (Fraser Health)

A nurse prepares to vaccinate healthcare workers at a COVID-19 drive-thru immunization site in Coquitlam in this image supplied to the media by Fraser Health on March 8, 2021. (Fraser Health)

OPINION: Helping a 97-year-old man get his COVID vaccination appointment

Call centre inundated with 1.7 million calls while there are just 50,000 folks over 90 in B.C.

Mr. Beagley will get his jab.

That may sound like the title of a British farce, but it’s just the reality for a lovely 97-year-old Chilliwack man who is scheduled to receive a COVID-19 vaccination Tuesday.

(This is a follow-up to a column I wrote about his situation, one that appeared online two weeks ago.)

READ MORE: OPINION: Daughter of 97-year-old Chilliwack man is asking when her father will get vaccinated

You see, Edmund A. Beagley’s daughter emailed me from her home in Dunstable in England, asking when her nonagenarian father would be able to get the vaccine.

“He had his flu jab in November at Save-On-Foods. Where will he need to register?”

I realized upon hearing the question, as a journalist and someone who is paying attention, I didn’t know the answer but I thought I should.

There was no concrete information from Fraser Health of the Ministry of Health about the vaccine rollout plan for those over 80 years old. As of Feb. 24, while Beagley’s daughter said he was feeling forgotten, living alone as he does, Dr. Bonnie Henry promised he was not: “We have not forgotten you. These plans are in place and we will be reaching out to you in the coming days and weeks.”

Of course, that wasn’t her message directly to him, but to all those older folks left waiting and wondering.

A lot can change in two weeks. And this week it started, with expansion of Phase 2 of the COVID-19 immunization plan, involving folks born in 1931 or earlier, and Indigenous elders born in 1956 or earlier.

Since I started communicating with Beagley’s daughter Mary, I felt obliged to carry this through, to not just write about the situation as she was happy for me to do, but to find out when it would happen.

Finally, yes, the plan announced last week: March 8, those born in 1931 or earlier can start booking for appointments starting March 15; on March 15, seniors 85 or older can book appointments starting March 22; and on March 22, those 80 or over can book for appointments starting March 29.

But as Mr. Beagley is quite hard of hearing, and has no relatives in Chilliwack, I agreed to book the appointment for him. Ready with his date of birth, postal code and health number, my alarm went off at 6:59 a.m. this morning, and I started calling at 7 a.m.

So did everyone else.

While there are only 50,000 people aged over 90, at one point before noon it was reported the call centres had received 1.7 million calls. Health Minister Adrian Dix asked people who shouldn’t be calling to stop.

However, there is another reason why they received so many calls. I myself tried 35 times before giving up, receiving either a busy signal, an endless silence, or a message to hang up and try again. Do the math: 50,000 times 35 is 1.75 million, so it honestly could have just been the 90-year-old cohort and those helping them who were clogging up the lines.

READ MORE: B.C. officials plead for patience as 1.7 million COVID-19 calls flood in

(By Tuesday, Health Minister Adrian Dix was blaming Telus for the phone problems)

In Fraser Health, however, it was pointed out to me by someone on Twitter that appointments can be made online.

This is not available in Vancouver Coastal Health. After getting booted off the website four times – success. Not only was I able to book Mr. Beagley an appointment, there were appointments available as early as Tuesday, not starting March 15 as originally announced.

It’s not surprising so many people called right as the booking times were made available … people are anxious. I mean, I did it. But by 8:45 a.m. we had him all booked in, and while many have made complaints about the phone system, there really is no rush now as the 90-year-olds have four more days to book.

We’ve waited this long. The vaccines are in place with more on the way. Healthcare practitioners in other fields are taking the 20-hour course needed to administer vaccines. Larger clinics are being set up.

It’s been a year since this pandemic began, but vaccinations are happening. Sure, communication could have been better, and yes it should have been rolled out faster, but needles are going in arms starting this week. By summer, maybe, just maybe, we will have a bit of our lives back.

After booking his appointment, I called Mr. Beagley to let him know. It was a challenging conversation only because of his hearing loss, but he got it all down, repeated it back and he was quite thankful.

“Do you need me to give you a ride to the appointment?” I asked, assuming he would need one.

“No, no, I’ve got wheels,” the 97-year-old replied, something his daughter confirmed.

Good for him.

Mr. Beagley has the wheels to roll. And at long last, he can roll up his sleeves and get his jab and carry on.

RELATED: 22 COVID vaccine clinics to be opened for seniors 90+, Indigenous seniors 65+ in Fraser Health


Do you have something to add to this story, or something else we should report on? Email:
editor@theprogress.com

@TheProgress
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Just Posted

The Langley Centennial Museum is hoping the public can help identify people in this photo from the Sperling Church Sunday School. (Langley Township photo)
Did you attend Sperling Church Sunday School in Langley?

Local residents can help ID people in historic local photos and preserve Langley history

Higher sales of cannabis helped Canadian farmers come out in the green. (Black Press Media File)
Cannabis processing could start shop in North Langley

Company is the latest to work on industrial operations locally

Langley Quilters Guild helped honour two long-time members of the Langley Memorial Hospital Auxiliary, including Pat Walker (left), with “beautiful quilts” to express appreciation for their years of service to the non-profit. Her quilt was presented by Nuala Adderley (right), the guild vice-president. (Special to Langley Advance Times)
Giving everlasting thanks to devoted Langley volunteers

Quilts given to two women who donate more than 30+ years each to Langley Memorial Hospital Auxiliary

Nixon Mahovlic, 8, was inspired by kindness week at Fort Langley Elementary so he set out to collect bottles to raise money for a local family in need. (Steve Mahovlic/Special to Langley Advance Times)
Daily confirmed COVID-19 cases reported to B.C. public health, seven-day rolling average in white, to May 12, 2021. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. preparing ‘Restart 2.0’ from COVID-19 as June approaches

Daily infections fall below 500 Friday, down to 387 in hospital

Poached trees that were taken recently on Vancouver Island in the Mount Prevost area near Cowichan, B.C. are shown on Sunday, May 10, 2021. Big trees, small trees, dead trees, softwoods and hardwoods have all become valuable targets of tree poachers in British Columbia as timber prices hit record levels. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jen Osborne.
Tree poaching from public forests increasing in B.C. as lumber hits record prices

Prices for B.C. softwood lumber reached $1,600 for 1,000 board feet compared with about $300 a year ago

The warm weather means time for a camping trip, or at least an excursion into nature. How much do you know about camps and camping-related facts? (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: Are you ready to go camping?

How many camp and camping-related questions can you answer?

The Independent Investigations Office of BC (IIO) (File Photo)
Police watchdog investigating after man found dead in Surrey following a wellness check

IIO says officers ‘reportedly spoke to a man at the home before departing’

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

On Friday, May 14 at Meadow Gardens Golf Club in Pitt Meadows, Michael Caan joined a very elite club of golfers who have shot under 60 (Instagram)
Crowds at English Bay were blasted with a large beam of light from an RCMP Air-1 helicopter on Friday, May 14. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marc Grandmaison
Police enlist RCMP helicopter to disperse thousands crowded on Vancouver beach

On Friday night, police were witness to ‘several thousand people staying well into the evening’

People shop in Chinatown in Vancouver on Friday, February 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Vancouver community leaders call for action following 717% rise in anti-Asian hate crimes

‘The alarming rise of anti-Asian hate in Canada and south of the border shows Asians have not been fully accepted in North America,’ says Carol Lee

Sinikka Gay Elliott was reported missing on Salt Spring Island on Wednesday, May 12. (Courtesty Salt Spring RCMP)
Body of UBC professor found on Salt Spring Island, no foul play suspected

Sinikka Elliott taught sociology at the university

Most Read